General Why Are The Warriors Crowds So BAD!!

playdaball_old

Guest
I'm a Warriors season ticket holder and have beEn now for a number of years. I love going to the watch the Warriors as it is an opportunity for me to spend time with friends and family and at the same time I can yell and scream along with others at Mt Smart.

Why though is it that there are only about 12,500 (average) people yelling with me?

The club now needs to look at the opportunities (if contracts permit and $ stack up) of taking games to other cities such as Wellington and Ch Ch.

Hurts me to say this but Aucklanders do not deserve to have 12 NRL games played in this City.

Why are people not attending?

- Rain
- Financial reasons
- Too easy to watch at home on TV
- Other commitments
- Watching other sports or activities
- Can't be bothered with the Warriors anymore
- Warriors too inconsistent
- Live too far away

What are your thoughts especially if you do not go to watch them play LIVE?
 

scree_old

Guest
Location is definitely a problem.

I lived in Auckland City for a couple of years and I was a huge Warriors supporter. This was in 2002, the football was great. But I only made it out to one game in the end.

Now I live in Wellington and I can walk to the stadium to watch the Phoenix or the Black Caps. If the Warriors ever played at Westpac Stadium I would be there every game.
 

mrblonde_old

Guest
As a season-tickettter since 1996:

1: Rugby league is not the national game. Therefore, there's not as much publicity and hype as there is with rugby union. Out of sight, out of mind.
2: Fair weather friendship. Which is in part due to 1. The Warriors would be one of, if not the, lowest NRL teams in terms of fulltime season ticket numbers (ie I think we're 8,000-8,500 this year). The Warriors rely, from everything I've ever read, very heavily on the walk-up crowd, the "what'll we do today/this weekend? Oh, there's the Warriors and they're playing well so let's go to Mt Smart" crowd.
3: Fair weather.The walk-up crowd is in turn influenced by fair weather - yesterday would have been better if the weather had been better and, in autumn and winter, it's quite often cold/chilly (I think :) ) and add rain to the mix and it's not much fun. Especially when you add 4.
4: Performance. The Warriors are inconsistency personified. A lot of people will stay at home, watch a Warriors game on TV and see them win. They will then go to Mt Smart, watch a Warriors game live and see them lose. Conclusion - If I'm gonna watch the Warriors lose, I'll do it at home/in a pub/with mates on TV because it's less expensive money and time wise.
5: You mention taking games outside Auckland. On the face of it, that's a good idea as they have had good crowds. But for me there's three things: As you mentioned, existing contracts. Getting out of the Mt Smart contract may cost serious moolah if Mt Smart can't find a replacement for the weekend the Warriors have said they will be having a home game in Wellington, not Auckland. Moolah the Warriors probably don't have and Watson et al may not want to front up on.
The one-off factor. How many people, having gone to the Warriors game against the Roosters in Christchurch, would go again? How many were there out of curiousity, but actually they prefer union/football/croquet and would have gone to that if it had been on at the same/similar time? Magnify that in more obvious rugby union heartland country.
What will taking the game out of Auckland do for the bottom line? Season ticketters in Auckland will require some kind of compensation - ie lower cost - to take into account the one or two games they will no longer have at Mt Smart, but knowing Watson, et al I wouldn't pick that as their first port of call or if they did that, it would be a measley decrease. Would that lead to snippy Aucklanders not buying season ticket sales, therefore offesetting any gain in revemue elsewhere?
6: Bastille is right. Certainly about the location. Carlaw Park was much more central than Mt Smart is but unfortunately just wasn't up to NRL standard - heck wasn't up to ARL standard by the end. And since the waterfront stadium didn't stack up for me for various reasons....

Weigh those up against the "if you're called New Zealand, why don't you play home games outside Auckland!?" argument... And as I've said elsewhere on here, I have views on that subject.
 
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DanKokoro_old

Guest
I was planning to go to alot more games this year but I've only been to two .. Manly and Panthers. Both losses.

For me it's mainly the hassle of getting there, finding parking etc, and getting back. Also most games are on sunday when i can't really be F'd doing anything except sitting on the couch.

I love watching them live though, nothing really compares to it. Just a combination of factors that doesn't really motivate me to go.
 

DanKokoro_old

Guest
As a season-tickettter since 1996:


4: Performance. The Warriors are inconsistency personified. A lot of people will stay at home, watch a Warriors game on TV and see them win. They will then go to Mt Smart, watch a Warriors game live and see them lose. Conclusion - If I'm gonna watch the Warriors lose, I'll do it at home/in a pub/with mates on TV because it's less expensive money and time wise.

Yep that's a big one for me too haha
 

playdaball_old

Guest
As a season-tickettter since 1996:

1: Rugby league is not the national game. Therefore, there's not as much publicity and hype as there is with rugby union. Out of sight, out of mind.
2: Fair weather friendship. Which is in part due to 1. The Warriors would be one of, if not the, lowest NRL teams in terms of fulltime season ticket numbers (ie I think we're 8,000-8,500 this year). The Warriors rely, from everything I've ever read, very heavily on the walk-up crowd, the "what'll we do today/this weekend? Oh, there's the Warriors and they're playing well so let's go to Mt Smart" crowd.
3: Fair weather.The walk-up crowd is in turn influenced by fair weather - yesterday would have been better if the weather had been better and, in autumn and winter, it's quite often cold/chilly (I think :) ) and add rain to the mix and it's not much fun. Especially when you add 4.
4: Performance. The Warriors are inconsistency personified. A lot of people will stay at home, watch a Warriors game on TV and see them win. They will then go to Mt Smart, watch a Warriors game live and see them lose. Conclusion - If I'm gonna watch the Warriors lose, I'll do it at home/in a pub/with mates on TV because it's less expensive money and time wise.
5: You mention taking games outside Auckland. On the face of it, that's a good idea as they have had good crowds. But for me there's three things: As you mentioned, existing contracts. Getting out of the Mt Smart contract may cost serious moolah if Mt Smart can't find a replacement for the weekend the Warriors have said they will be having a home game in Wellington, not Auckland. Moolah the Warriors probably don't have and Watson et al may not want to front up on.
The one-off factor. How many people, having gone to the Warriors game against the Roosters in Christchurch, would go again? How many were there out of curiousity, but actually they prefer union/football/croquet and would have gone to that if it had been on at the same/similar time? Magnify that in more obvious rugby union heartland country.
What will taking the game out of Auckland do for the bottom line? Season ticketters in Auckland will require some kind of compensation - ie lower cost - to take into account the one or two games they will no longer have at Mt Smart, but knowing Watson, et al I wouldn't pick that as their first port of call or if they did that, it would be a measley decrease. Would that lead to snippy Aucklanders not buying season ticket sales, therefore offesetting any gain in revemue elsewhere?
6: Bastille is right. Certainly about the location. Carlaw Park was much more central than Mt Smart is but unfortunately just wasn't up to NRL standard - heck wasn't up to ARL standard by the end. And since the waterfront stadium didn't stack up for me for various reasons....

Weigh those up against the "if you're called New Zealand, why don't you play home games outside Auckland!?" argument... And as I've said elsewhere on here, I have views on that subject.

Partly agree with a lot of your comments
 
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Fazz_old

Guest
Location - I split my time between Hamilton and Rotorua, on a students income it's not really financially viable. Plus when I used to head up to the games with mum/mates the stadium is just such a prick to find/find parking near. The warriors need to think about relocating or something if possible in the future.
 

PB_old

Guest
Followed the Warriors since inception, attending games when able, but started going regularly about a decade ago. I've never been a season ticket holder, but attended 9 or so games a year, plus a pre-season. Occasionally my wife would join me.

I stopped attending last year, and stopped watching for quite a while. This was mainly because of a change in my perspective. I don't get upset when I watch the Warriors live, but do via broadcast, so I chose to cut myself off to 'reboot' the way I deal with it. Getting so emotional over a game was silly.

This year I haven't gone because I value time with my family more, a change in budget, and the business dealings of Watson and Hotchin. I feel that putting any money into the club is rewarding them.

I have followed the Rabbitohs since the late '80s - supporting the Warriors in preference purely due to being a NZ team - and almost became a Rabbitohs away member this year. But when all said and done I support local businesses first. This is the main reason why I didn't, and why my stance on the owners may change.

So, now, what would make me (and possibly my wife and daughter) become a season ticket holder of the Warriors (and not eventually gravitate toward the Bunnys)?

*Regaining a modicum of respect for Watson and Hotchin.
*If we placed a greater value on the Warriors than other budgeted items.
*If they played out of Eden Park. Eden Park is not far from here, I use public transport, and I'd find it hard to resist taking advantage of having the Warriors there.

Anyway, that's me. As to others, Mr. Blonde has covered that nicely. I'll dip my toe into that soon.
 
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playdaball_old

Guest
Interesting that location comes into play. IMO Mt Smart is the most central location and easiest to get to (close to motorways) vs. other Auckland venues - North Harbour and Eden Park.
It is also easy to get parking especially vs. Eden Park.
 

Spence_old

Guest
I just reckon it's too expensive for on-the-fence fans. $35-40 for a decent seat? Get out of town.
 

Spence_old

Guest
Interesting that location comes into play. IMO Mt Smart is the most central location and easiest to get to (close to motorways) vs. other Auckland venues - North Harbour and Eden Park.
It is also easy to get parking especially vs. Eden Park.

Yeah, parking is ridiculously easy, there's about 10 $5 car parks within 3-5min walk of the stadium.
 

teariki_old

Guest
Weather may play a part in crowd attendences, it seems that just about every Warriors home match during winter it's raining. Only the true supporters come out during bad weather, and parents may think twice about bringing their kids out when the weather's poor.

You can bet though if the Warriors get any home play-off matches they'll get a full ground.
 

PB_old

Guest
The Warriors have been slow when it comes to providing membership options. I notice they have South Stand, North Bank, a Family Covered, and a non-ticketed away-membership in 2011. This will help.

Sydney is a rugby league town. A traditional team like Souths have 11K+ ticketed members. The highest in Sydney along with the Dragons. They have 18K+ if you include non-ticketed members.

Auckland is not a rugby league town. If the numbers are 8K, that's pretty good, but I suspect most of that is corporate, where the Warriors have focussed over the years. This has probably had an impact on non-corporate attendance as people notice when attention is skewed. Again, their 2011 re-jig will help.

Mt Smart is easy to get to and is the best option for existing supporters (Eden Park is just closer for me, and I'd prefer not to drive). When the 'SuperCity' crap goes down, and we get lumped with an expensive, dirty great refurbished stadium that rugby can't fill, then I expect Eden Park to come to the Warriors cap-in-hand at the prompting of the newly elected.

If it happened, would existing members travel to it, and would it get more walk-ups? Especially if it was in tandem with a couple of games taken on the road each year?

The Warriors have the option of a packed house at lower margins and creating a 'buzz', or higher margins with fewer people. They are well aware of the financial mechanics, but people buy a product when it is perceived to be good value, even if it's not, or if they feel like they 'belong'. You can go all One Community PR on everyone's arse, but until people actually believe it, value your team over other commitments, or identify with your club as a way of life, then it's all show.

History comes into this, and we have scant history. Clubs, and the NRL, have finally recognised this so reverting to traditional names, heritage rounds, strips, and playing on original grounds is common.

That's why we should have no significant home jersey changes. Use the heritage (old Warriors) version as the home strip for at least another twenty years. Refinements only. The away jersey should change yearly, rotating between versions of various district's rep jerseys. There could also be a 'guest' jersey, so if we have a game in ChCh that year, a version of the Canterbury Bulls could be worn. Give 17 signed jerseys to a mix of local ChCh clubs to auction. Have Warriors at the auction. Add, rinse, repeat. This variation could be used for clubs (as they have with Mt. Albert), schools (St Pauls), etc. Grow the connections.

I think 10 games should be in Auckland, and memberships reduced accordingly, with 2 games elsewhere. Ideally away from the main centres, as other team's 'home' games will likely be there (Obvious exception of Taupo and the Sharks). Northland would be my first stop, ideally against the Raiders early in the year. Then the new Dunedin stadium in the heart of winter... against North Queensland. The whitest team in the NRL has got to be the Dragons, so Rotorua for them (the contrast will work subliminally), and if the Perth Reds ever come back in, let's screw them over too. Got to be Queenstown.
 
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MarkW_old

Guest
I agree with most of what you have said pb.

I'll be watching with interest come Rugby WC time to see how Eden Park copes with the crowds and if any significant work will be done on the transport routes to the ground. The train station of course is quite close - but they will need to run a little more efficiently to encourage punters to use them.
Being plonked in a residential area is the big arse kicker for the Eden Park. The roads around there don't even cope well with regular daily rush hour traffic, and at Super 14 games they need to cone the roads and stick loads of signage out to control the flow.
Eden Park is definitely the most central location though... however, a brand new Carlaw Park would have been awesome... dreams are free.

Mt Smart is ok but ultimately it's still an athletics stadium masquerading as a footy park.
What would happen to the ground if the Warriors did decide to move house anyway?

As for going to the games, I haven't been to many in recent years. Mostly it's the cost involved especially now i've got a whacking great mortage to pay off. When I go I like to sit as close as possible to halfway too, so that means the ticket price is at the upper end of the scale which is fine but means I go less.

And yeah, parking is a pain even though I know a spot which is nearly always free even if it's not technically legal. :)
 

playdaball_old

Guest
Vodafone Warriors chief executive Wayne Scurrah today urged fans to move quickly to buy tickets for the club’s biggest home game of the season when they face the Brisbane Broncos at Mount Smart Stadium on Friday week (August 27).
As well as being critical to the Vodafone Warriors’ campaign to make the 2010 NRL finals their last home match of the regular season will also be one of historic significance.
Coinciding with the club’s 15th anniversary season, it will be the first time the Vodafone Warriors have hosted the Broncos in a Friday night game in Auckland since their memorable debut encounter on March 10, 1995.
“That was a massive night not just for the club and rugby league but for sport in New Zealand generally,” said Scurrah.
“Now we find ourselves facing the Broncos again 15 years on in our anniversary season in another Friday night home clash with so much on the line.
“Whatever happens in this coming weekend’s game against Manly, everything will be at stake for the finals when the Broncos play us on August 27. It will be a fantastic occasion and one that has created enormous interest already.
“We have completely sold out in all our corporate areas in the lounges, suites and booths and now fans are also making a run on tickets. We’d encourage everyone to join our Vodafone Warriors season members by securing their seats as soon as they can so they’re not disappointed.
“We’d love to have a full house to give the team fantastic support against the Broncos. As well as our NRL team, the Vodafone Junior Warriors also have everything to play for in the NYC. It’s a big night to be part of.”
Scurrah said the night would be significant on two other scores.
“It’s our old boys’ game. A big group of the former players are getting together and will be our guests for the night while we’ll also be using the occasion to acknowledge Steve Price’s tremendous contribution to the club following his retirement,” he said.
The Vodafone Warriors prepare for the Brisbane game by lining up against 2008 NRL premiers Manly at Brookvale Oval this Saturday night while the Broncos are up against the Knights in Newcastle on Friday night. The Vodafone Warriors are sixth on the points table with 28 points while the Broncos are eighth on 26 points.
The NRL match on August 27 – which Channel Nine will be covering – is due to kick off at 8.00pm with the NYC encounter scheduled for a 5.45pm start.
For more information about tickets, go to www.warriors.co.nz or www.ticketek.co.nz. Tickets can also be bought through Mad Butcher stores (Albany, Mangere East, Manukau City, Papakura and Glen Innes) and at the Vodafone Warriors’ office at Mount Smart Stadium.
 

Northern_Union

Guest
I have to ask....what in gods name is that abomination of a stand they are building on the hill? Talk about the ugliest girl in class getting uglier.