General Rugby Leagues Memory Lane

Jordan G

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Back last century many Auckland players, including Kiwis, worked on the rubbish trucks. They were very fit players as well. It isn't as silly as it sounds, actually I am very impressed. I wonder if any of our rock stars would consider it.:rolleyes:

Zero chance.

If they don't do extras, they're surely not interested in any further manual labour.
 
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Back last century many Auckland players, including Kiwis, worked on the rubbish trucks. They were very fit players as well. It isn't as silly as it sounds, actually I am very impressed. I wonder if any of our rock stars would consider it.:rolleyes:
Remember seeing Clayton Friend on the back of a Waste truck in Auckland.
He loved it.
Most of Waikatos best players were dusties as well.
 
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bruce

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Glenora won the Fox this year. I thought I would post this history lesson for Mount Wellington so he can appreciate all that has gone before in the Auckland game.
https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=3502394
Obituary: Guiding hand of rugby league
23 May, 2003 7:43pm

George Rainey. Rugby league administrator, nurseryman. Died aged 73.

For 50 years George Rainey was a powerful presence hovering over New Zealand rugby league, guiding the development of the game's players and facilities, its profile and its future.

He had a big hand in the purchase of Carlaw Park and the work to drain what was known as "The Swamp".
He fought the player-drain to Australia and England, and he pushed for inclusion of a New Zealand team in the Australian competition when others in league management were opposed.

Rainey died in Green Lane Hospital this week after a battle against lung cancer. It was one of the few fights he lost and, despite a style of leadership that tended towards the autocratic, most of those whom he beat now agree he deserved to win.

"I don't think that the chairman has to be the most popular guy in creation," he once said. But everyone knew he could do the job and do it well.

Rainey was the longest-serving chairman of the Auckland Rugby League, 13 years from 1972, then went on to chair the New Zealand Rugby League board from 1986 to 1992.

At meetings, all members could have their say. Then George would have his. They'd take the vote and the Rainey Way would win.

Occasionally he would be called to account and would threaten to resign. The overwhelming support would induce him to stay.
Rainey's family moved from the Hokianga area to the staunchly league suburb of Glen Eden just after World War II. At age 11, he turned up at the Glenora club to play.

He stuck with the game despite pressure to play rugby at Mt Albert Grammar School. And despite his slight frame he was a prop-secondrower.

But he was better known for his organisational drive.

And he was always a sportsman.

He won the J.S.W. Dickson Medal for most sportsmanlike player in the Auckland junior league in 1949.

As chairman attending big games, he would visit the dressing rooms of both teams pre-match to tell the players they were on show, to wear their jerseys with pride and play hard, not to disgrace the game with foul play.

Rainey stopped playing in 1953 when he married Eleanor, because his full attention was required by the nursery business he had started. In the early 1960s he bought land on Mountain Rd, Henderson, developing it into one of Auckland's largest plant suppliers. The couple moved to the property and raised sons Brian and Chris and daughter Patricia.

Rainey started in league management at Glenora, elected club secretary at 17, and was still involved when he died, as adviser to the judicial committee. He had managed the club side that included Kiwis Bill Sorenson and Maunga Emery. More recently he was a board member in the early days of the Auckland Warriors.

He was also a long-serving administrator for the NZ Nurserymen's Association, including three terms as president. His knowledge of plant propagation was widely sought and he had advised staff at the Auckland Botanical Gardens and television's Maggie's Garden Show.

The nursery was sold when Rainey "retired" but it kept his good name and he continued working from the sidelines. You would see him driving a small truck laden with plants around the western suburbs.

And you'd often see him at the league. He was at Carlaw Park for what is regarded as the ground's farewell, the 2002 Bartercard Cup final, not at all bitter about the possibility that the park he created would be sold.

"It's all part of the cycle of how the game moves forward," Rainey said.

He will be farewelled at the Glenora clubrooms at 1.30pm Monday - as a funeral notice said, at peace on the largest playing field.

 

bruce

Contributor
Very sad. He was a legend.

Back in 1963 a South African league team toured NZ and actually beat the Kiwis 4 -3 at Carlaw Park, and Auckland beat them 10 - 4.

The team was made up of South Africans playing in England and a couple of Australians brought in to cover injuries on the Australian leg of the tour. Because of that the game was not awarded test status.

I don't think Tom was on that tour but I watched both games. It showed the very high standard of rugby league in the North back then.
 
Very sad. He was a legend.

Back in 1963 a South African league team toured NZ and actually beat the Kiwis 4 -3 at Carlaw Park, and Auckland beat them 10 - 4.

The team was made up of South Africans playing in England and a couple of Australians brought in to cover injuries on the Australian leg of the tour. Because of that the game was not awarded test status.

I don't think Tom was on that tour but I watched both games. It showed the very high standard of rugby league in the North back then.
Was that when you were a Proposaurus? ;)
 

bruce

Contributor
If that's true, and the storm get Ata that would be brilliant for his development ... Auckland age-group league is TOTALLY different to the requirements for a half to be consistently successful in the NRL ... It's a totally different game
How things have changed, back in the day many players went straight from the Fox to Sydney first grade such as the brilliant Fred Ah Khoi. Even Tony Kemp went from Randwick in Wellington to Newcastle (note to Hardymans Yugo it was via Doncaster but that doesn't count;)). Something is seriously wrong with the Warriors development system and it is the clubs fault because it was working just fine before.

PS: I forgot Stacey Jones and Gene Ngamu
 
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mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
How things have changed, back in the day many players went straight from the Fox to Sydney first grade such as the brilliant Fred Ah Khoi. Even Tony Kemp went from Randwick in Wellington to Newcastle (note to Hardymans Yugo it was via Doncaster but that doesn't count;)). Something is seriously wrong with the Warriors development system and it is the clubs fault because it was working just fine before.

PS: I forgot Stacey Jones and Gene Ngamu
Fred joined the Bears some 35 years ago. Times have changed. Drastically. The Warriors U20 team always beat the Fox Memorial Premiers in preseason games...
 
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How things have changed, back in the day many players went straight from the Fox to Sydney first grade such as the brilliant Fred Ah Khoi. Even Tony Kemp went from Randwick in Wellington to Newcastle (note to Hardymans Yugo it was via Doncaster but that doesn't count;)). Something is seriously wrong with the Warriors development system and it is the clubs fault because it was working just fine before.

PS: I forgot Stacey Jones and Gene Ngamu

Now if you just make a list of the players that went from Auckland club sides and didn't make it in Sydney first grade I'll be impressed, it may require you use the next 2000 pages of this thread though.
 
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mt.wellington

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Now if you just make a list of the players that went from Auckland club sides and didn't make it in Sydney first grade I'll be impressed, it may require you use the next 2000 pages of this thread though.
Only one I can think of in recent history is Manu Ma'u. It happens very rarely these days. Most are picked up via the Warriors own development systems ie NYC or ISP...
 

bruce

Contributor
Now if you just make a list of the players that went from Auckland club sides and didn't make it in Sydney first grade I'll be impressed, it may require you use the next 2000 pages of this thread though.
The point was the standard of the local competition. The standard of the local competition back then was so good players routinely went from Fox to first grade, let alone reserve grade in Sydney. That would never happen now, they have trouble getting of Warriors reserve grade to Warriors FG, which is basically reserve grade standard anyway.
 
The point was the standard of the local competition. The standard of the local competition back then was so good players routinely went from Fox to first grade, let alone reserve grade in Sydney. That would never happen now, they have trouble getting of Warriors reserve grade to Warriors FG, which is basically reserve grade standard anyway.

Now whether that is true or false why is that the Warriors fault, if they could do it before the Warriors existed what's stopping players now from simply going around the Warriors. I tend to agree with Mt W in believing the game has moved on rather than the Warriors have but the hand brake on players opportunities.

Of course a lack of game time at Carlaw may be the problem, fucken Eric Watson.

Oh and the new coalition of fools in government, but that goes without saying, too busy planting trees, building houses and not signing the TPP.
 
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mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Now whether that is true or false why is that the Warriors fault, if they could do it before the Warriors existed what's stopping players now from simply going around the Warriors. I tend to agree with Mt W in believing the game has moved on rather than the Warriors have but the hand brake on players opportunities.

Of course a lack of game time at Carlaw may be the problem, fucken Eric Watson.

Oh and the new coalition of fools in government, but that goes without saying, too busy planting trees, building houses and not signing the TPP.
Also kids are getting plucked out of comps much younger. All the best young talent is getting signed up early and only the late developers remain...
 

bruce

Contributor
Also kids are getting plucked out of comps much younger. All the best young talent is getting signed up early and only the late developers remain...
A good example:
https://www.nzherald.co.nz/sport/news/article.cfm?c_id=4&objectid=11945069
League: Kiwis playmaker Kodi Nikorima reveals story that changed his life
Kiwis playmaker Kodi Nikorima has revealed his shock at discovering his parents sacrificed their own careers and moved the family to Australia to give both him and brother Jayden the best chance of breaking into the NRL.

The 23-year-old Brisbane Broncos utility was born in Palmerston North before his father's job in the Army saw them relocate to Burnham Camp, just south of Christchurch, where he first began playing rugby league as a youngster.

Nikorima told PlayersVoice.com.au that he had grown up believing his parents relocated to Brisbane in search of a better life, but he was stunned to learn recently that they made the move to give the boys better opportunities to fulfil their footballing potential.

It was during a chat with his father's best friend, Duane Peterson, at a family barbeque in Christchurch two weeks ago that he learned his father had actually passed up a military promotion to give his sons the best chance of cracking the big time. It was a story he says changed his life.
"Mum and Dad had a talk about it and, instead of taking the promotion, they took a punt on Jayden and me and moved to Brisbane," said to PlayersVoice.com.au.

"Dad loved the army, but he loved us much more. He found work in security at the airport and Mum worked with the police. It was a huge sacrifice and they did it for us, for our footy.

"Dad works on Manus Island these days but he's back in Australia at the moment. I intend to ask him more about this when I see him in the next week or two.

"To this day, he's never said anything to me about this. I still get quite emotional thinking about it.

"When his mate told me, I had a feeling in my stomach. You know what it's like. It's a feeling of overwhelming love and gratitude.

"There aren't really words for it. It's just something you feel and I'm very grateful for it."

Despite having spent the bulk of his life in Australia, Nikorima says it was a "no-brainer" when he decided to represent New Zealand, having grown up dreaming of pulling on the Kiwis jersey.

It was a different story for 21-year-old Jayden, who learned all of his football in Australia and felt a stronger connection to the green and gold.

"Jayden chose Australia. He has played for the Junior Kangaroos and the Queensland under 20s. He reasoned that Australia had taught him everything about rugby league. It was where he developed as a junior and made his career as a professional.

"In recognition of that, he felt he should wear the green-and-gold. It made perfect sense to me.

"Before he made the decision, he went to my parents to explain the reasons behind his decision and to seek their blessing. They supported his move 100 percent, just as they had with me."

Nikorima says he has never played in front of a crowd like that which packed out Waikato Stadium for the Kiwis Rugby League World Cup clash against Tonga in Hamilton last week.

He was dropped in the wake of the Kiwis shock 28-22 loss, after a couple of glaring defensive errors in the second-half, but insists belief in the camp remains strong that they can resurrect their campaign starting in tomorrow's quarter-final against Fiji in Wellington.

"Despite the result, our mindsets haven't changed. It's just a different pathway now. I still think we have a team that can go all the way at this tournament. We've got the talent, the dedication and the belief.

"Given what I know now about the sacrifices Dad made for me to play rugby league all those years ago, a New Zealand World Cup victory would be about as good a present as I could imagine giving him."
 
A good example:
https://www.nzherald.co.nz/sport/news/article.cfm?c_id=4&objectid=11945069
League: Kiwis playmaker Kodi Nikorima reveals story that changed his life
Kiwis playmaker Kodi Nikorima has revealed his shock at discovering his parents sacrificed their own careers and moved the family to Australia to give both him and brother Jayden the best chance of breaking into the NRL.

The 23-year-old Brisbane Broncos utility was born in Palmerston North before his father's job in the Army saw them relocate to Burnham Camp, just south of Christchurch, where he first began playing rugby league as a youngster.

Nikorima told PlayersVoice.com.au that he had grown up believing his parents relocated to Brisbane in search of a better life, but he was stunned to learn recently that they made the move to give the boys better opportunities to fulfil their footballing potential.

It was during a chat with his father's best friend, Duane Peterson, at a family barbeque in Christchurch two weeks ago that he learned his father had actually passed up a military promotion to give his sons the best chance of cracking the big time. It was a story he says changed his life.
"Mum and Dad had a talk about it and, instead of taking the promotion, they took a punt on Jayden and me and moved to Brisbane," said to PlayersVoice.com.au.

"Dad loved the army, but he loved us much more. He found work in security at the airport and Mum worked with the police. It was a huge sacrifice and they did it for us, for our footy.

"Dad works on Manus Island these days but he's back in Australia at the moment. I intend to ask him more about this when I see him in the next week or two.

"To this day, he's never said anything to me about this. I still get quite emotional thinking about it.

"When his mate told me, I had a feeling in my stomach. You know what it's like. It's a feeling of overwhelming love and gratitude.

"There aren't really words for it. It's just something you feel and I'm very grateful for it."

Despite having spent the bulk of his life in Australia, Nikorima says it was a "no-brainer" when he decided to represent New Zealand, having grown up dreaming of pulling on the Kiwis jersey.

It was a different story for 21-year-old Jayden, who learned all of his football in Australia and felt a stronger connection to the green and gold.

"Jayden chose Australia. He has played for the Junior Kangaroos and the Queensland under 20s. He reasoned that Australia had taught him everything about rugby league. It was where he developed as a junior and made his career as a professional.

"In recognition of that, he felt he should wear the green-and-gold. It made perfect sense to me.

"Before he made the decision, he went to my parents to explain the reasons behind his decision and to seek their blessing. They supported his move 100 percent, just as they had with me."

Nikorima says he has never played in front of a crowd like that which packed out Waikato Stadium for the Kiwis Rugby League World Cup clash against Tonga in Hamilton last week.

He was dropped in the wake of the Kiwis shock 28-22 loss, after a couple of glaring defensive errors in the second-half, but insists belief in the camp remains strong that they can resurrect their campaign starting in tomorrow's quarter-final against Fiji in Wellington.

"Despite the result, our mindsets haven't changed. It's just a different pathway now. I still think we have a team that can go all the way at this tournament. We've got the talent, the dedication and the belief.

"Given what I know now about the sacrifices Dad made for me to play rugby league all those years ago, a New Zealand World Cup victory would be about as good a present as I could imagine giving him."
Parents must be so proud of Jayden snorting and pissing his opportunity away!
 
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bruce

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