General NRL Footy Programs Discussion Thread

Rizzah

Stop Being Shit
Contributor
Apr 18, 2012
5,471
Dunedin, NZ
Did anyone catch the Matty Johns Podcast?

I ended up watching NRL 360 on delay so only caught part of it. Caught the part with him talking about halves like Cleary and Crofts roll at the Broncos. The Croft talk was him repeating what he said on NRL 360. I've been watching more podcasts the last few years. Traditional shows usually follow a specific structure, boxing or MMA shows either work through the fight card in order where podcasts go back and forth. This could be a decent watch if it is focused on the on field play.
 
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Onewarrior

1st Grade Fringe
Jul 10, 2013
446
Tauranga
I’m not impressed, I rang them yesterday to find out, person I spoke to emailed the Prime programming dept., she rang back a couple of hours later, to say they didn’t know, things could change and to watch the listings, what’s wrong with a simple yes/ no answer.
I'm pleased to report that the Warriors vs Knights game has appeared in the Prime TV listings finally on Saturday night, well early Sunday morning actually, but better late than never, I am very happy.
 
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Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
10,623
Radio Sport in NZ is gone.

It will leave a huge hole in sports coverage here in NZ.

They have had plenty of warriors coverage over the years including game day commentary.
Any news on whether this is a temporary or permanent closure?
 

Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
10,623
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snake77

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 12, 2013
10,216
Auckland
I used to enjoy listening to RadioSport while driving around, especially when I used to work in town and had more of a commute.

Darcy and Goran doing The week that was" was great. Pulling out all of the silly moments from the week.

Also used to enjoy their regular guests from the UK or America. Big Ben Maller was good going over the American sports.
 

Ranger

1st Grade Fringe
May 23, 2012
997
Sad day. Grew up listening to Radio Sport, looking forward to school holidays as it meant being able to listen to the likes of Brendan Telfer and Graeme Hill.

Still tuned in nowdays in the evenings as I appreciated the Fox Sports playing overnight.

Seemed to happen with very little notice (apart from all the sport being cancelled obviously)
 
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snake77

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 12, 2013
10,216
Auckland
They had a period on The Week that Was with a blind guy calling Willie Los'e.

Los'e: "Whats everyone more interested in watching at the moment on Sky the rugby or the league"
Caller: "You know me Willie I'm blind so I can't jstify buying something I can't see"
Los'e jumps in with a long statment before finishing with "So X will be watching the league"
Caller "Er no I won't cause I can't see it"

To be fair the last part I didn't catch on first listen. But hearing it back in full was hilarious.

Then the guy called back the following week and got Los'e again.
 

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
20,962
Brendan Telfer
A very unpopular guy apparently but good to listen to IMO. Did an excellent interview with Wayne Bennett once. I have a suspicion he was seen as a mainstay of the station and earned more than the others because of it.
I understand it is permanent.
A few years back I had to do some business with one of their jocks who has gone on to greater things...so no names. From all accounts their ratings were unimpressive, although the league half hour on Mondays was very popular. So sadly I am not surprised. Just don't shut down the Sound as well. :eek:
 

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
20,962
They have had plenty of warriors coverage over the years including game day commentary.
Not getting at Mount Wellington ( I never would ;) :D) but when I first brought up about Allen Mac retiring from Radio Sport he had never heard of him. That sort of hinted to me that Radio Sport was for dinosaurs. The modern generation get their kicks from other places.
 
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matiunz

This year yet?
Contributor
Jul 15, 2013
8,986
Sydney
Not getting at Mount Wellington ( I never would ;) :D) but when I first brought up about Allen Mac retiring from Radio Sport he had never heard of him. That sort of hinted to me that Radio Sport was for dinosaurs. The modern generation get their kicks from other places.
Think the rise of podcasts has probably taken a chunk of their potential audience, similar to traditional TV vs streaming I’d say- convenience of consuming content when you want vs scheduled programming
 

jonesy101

1st Grade Fringe
Aug 28, 2016
1,113
They had a period on The Week that Was with a blind guy calling Willie Los'e.

Los'e: "Whats everyone more interested in watching at the moment on Sky the rugby or the league"
Caller: "You know me Willie I'm blind so I can't jstify buying something I can't see"
Los'e jumps in with a long statment before finishing with "So X will be watching the league"
Caller "Er no I won't cause I can't see it"

To be fair the last part I didn't catch on first listen. But hearing it back in full was hilarious.

Then the guy called back the following week and got Los'e again.
He came up with some classics at times. The only other one I can find at the moment is when he was having a rant about why Boca Juniors didn't show some respect and come here with their senior side 😂 .
 

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
20,962
a very good article:
Any Given Monday: The brilliant voices of Radio Sport will be sorely missed
I grew up with Radio Sport. It was as much a part of my summer as backyard cricket, the beach and stone fruit.

It wasn't called Radio Sport back then. It was Sports Roundup and I still love the practicality of that old name.

The names and voices are still etched in my memory banks. There was Rocky Patterson with his manic tennis commentaries, the electricity of Stu Scott from the bowls, and the mellifluous Alan Richards live from Eden Park.

It was the cricket that kept me coming back. Places like Molyneux Park, Alexandra, and Harry Barker Reserve, Gisborne, sounded so exotic to 11-year-old ears.

There would be frustrations, of course. I would quietly seethe when the commentary didn't shift immediately to wherever Jock Edwards was batting. I didn't mind Dave Dempsey, but the rest of the Canterbury top order was so boring to listen to.

On one family camping holiday around the East Cape I learned that the regional network only patched in Sports Roundup for occasional bursts. When it's blowing a gale and you have no cricket to listen to, Hicks Bay can be a pretty bleak place to hole up in.

The station changed dramatically over the years. Not just the name. The talent did too. For Rocky Patterson, read the equally manic Matt Brown. For Alan Richards, insert Bryan Waddle, Daniel McHardy or Andrew Alderson.

There are many more of course; too many to mention. All are brilliant practitioners of their craft; all voices that gave sport currency and vitality.

The voices went quiet today. Sport is much poorer for it.

Meanwhile let's be optimistic and say big sport will return to screens and stadia somewhere around the middle of the year. In all likelihood, the grounds will remain without crowds for a good while longer, but just play along for the moment.

Sport will return in an orgy of goodwill. If there's one thing we've learned it is that watching your favourite team get taught a lesson by the team you hate most in the world is not actually the worst thing that can happen.
Watching your favourite team or player getting mugged by refereeing or umpiring malfeasance is not the end of the world.

(There was a time when I thought that the collusion between assistant referee Jerome Garces and Romain Poite to deny the All Blacks a clear and obvious penalty at the end of the 2017 Lions series was a crime; now it's the sort of talking point all sports fans would savour.)

Things will be different, though. That much is clear. The goodwill and excitement met by sport's return will be ephemeral.

The relationship between Big Sport and its consumers is balanced on a knife edge. For a generation that simply hasn't mattered. The ménage à trois between rights-holding broadcasters, the corporate world and Big Sport has given them everything they needed: the rest, including non-rights holding media, have been cast into the role of voyeur.

The bonds that have tied those relationships together are increasingly fragile – possibly broken.

Watching your favourite team or player getting mugged by refereeing or umpiring malfeasance is not the end of the world.

(There was a time when I thought that the collusion between assistant referee Jerome Garces and Romain Poite to deny the All Blacks a clear and obvious penalty at the end of the 2017 Lions series was a crime; now it's the sort of talking point all sports fans would savour.)

Things will be different, though. That much is clear. The goodwill and excitement met by sport's return will be ephemeral.

The relationship between Big Sport and its consumers is balanced on a knife edge. For a generation that simply hasn't mattered. The ménage à trois between rights-holding broadcasters, the corporate world and Big Sport has given them everything they needed: the rest, including non-rights holding media, have been cast into the role of voyeur.

The bonds that have tied those relationships together are increasingly fragile – possibly broken.

Speaking to Jim Kayes on the now-discontinued Radio Sport recently (it saddens me to write that sentence), Sky CEO Martin Stewart acknowledged that subscriptions were struggling.






"We are obviously seeing some people who no longer wish to subscribe to the sports channels," he said.

When sport comes back, they're not all going to come back with it. People who have got used to doing without will continue to do so, while the devastating impact coronavirus is having on the economy and employment numbers will force more households to make decisions around discretionary income.

It's this simple: when it comes to a choice between putting a tank of gas in your car and watching the Hurricanes v Highlanders of a Friday night, it's a pretty simple decision for most.

The downstream effects of fewer subscribers are profound for Big Sport but all point in the same direction: less revenue. You don't need me to tell you what less revenue means for sporting organisations.

Likewise, the corporate dollar is going to be more keenly sought by all sectors of society in the aftermath of the pandemic. The traditional big spenders in sport – your banks and automotive giants for example – are acutely aware that managing their image will play a big part in their rebuild.

Expect their sponsorship spend to be increasingly community focused. It will be difficult for many to justify pouring money into Big Sport when so many other sectors – health and education to name two – will be seen as having more immediate needs.

Again, to join the dots, smaller sponsorship spends equal less revenue for sporting bodies.

This all means the voyeurs are suddenly important again.

Big Sport is going to have to reconnect with those it has taken for granted for two decades and it is going to have to do it at the sort of granular level they have forgotten about.

It will take more than sending an All Black, a Black Cap, a Silver Fern et cetera into a school for a cheesy photo op (the Bulldogs might have ruined that for everyone, anyway), for the gap between professional sport and the community to close.

When the time is right, professional sport has to reconnect.

It will be harder, too. You will read elsewhere today that mainstream media's commitment to sport has been compromised further. Radio Sport has gone and the ability of the country's major codes to earworm into the conscious of its fans has just become so much harder.

Big Sport has to become more accessible. It has to become an experience. For too long now the stadium experience has offered fans – the ones not inside a box eating soft cheeses and quaffing pinot noir – a crap night out.

Daytime sport has to be back on the agenda. Picnic baskets at grounds have to make a comeback. Things that sound trivial in the grand scheme of things now mean something. The connection between sport and community is tenuous and administrators can't be seduced by the initial rush of fan euphoria when it comes back into thinking it can carry on as before.

I recently read a piece by a poet I believe – you'll have to forgive me for forgetting where and by whom; it feels like I've done nothing but read for a week now – who pointed to the inherent difficulty faced by Big Sport in the post-pandemic world.

The writer said, to loosely and possibly inaccurately paraphrase, that sport had relied for years on monetising the "obsession" of its followers. If this global catastrophe has taught the human race one thing, it is perspective.

Wringing cold, hard cash out of perspective will be one of Big Sport's defining challenges. Wringing it out of the community it has paid lip-service to, another.



I've had a couple of interesting responses to last week's column calling on rugby and league bosses to start considering the idea of a merger.



One reader, who asked not to be named because of his ongoing connection to one of the sports, wrote.

"Good read. I Suspect it may be forced on them in Australia. The ARU is looking at a $60m loss, NRL staring at oblivion, broadcasters reeling... the best chance for both is to come back as a united code and the Aussies are brash enough to make it happen.

"I think NZ needs to get out of Sanzaar and align with Japan and potentially with whatever comes out of Australia, even if it means they have to play a merged code. Australia will be gone as a pure rugby code and South Africa will be off to Europe. NZ-Japan may have to consider joining forces with the new Aussie code to get Aussie interest in the product.

"Europe (World Rugby and the clubs) will be greedy post-corona, so I think the more likely scenario is that rugby swallows league and the south falls meekly into line to ensure financial survival."

Another reader, Willie, wrote: "Cricket is the model. [The sport has been] built on class and race differences but now one global organisation with various formats being played 12 months a year. More importantly, it does not split the funding base.

"[A single rugby code] could have 15s 13s, 10s, 7s, club, regional and international leagues all with women (the fastest growing sector of both codes).

"From a business sense it is a no-brainer. No brains are exactly what we have when we wear our tribal hats."
 

snake77

Warriors 1st Grader
Jul 12, 2013
10,216
Auckland
I used to enjoy listening to the talk back. Some of it was informative listeners some of it was out there. Some of the hosts could get your blood boiling with stupid viewpoints.

I remember Murrary Deaker talking about the Mad Butcher hating one of his callers. The guy was a regular but didn't use his real name. The Butcher "Don't start me on him, he doesn't even know his own name". I remember calling a customer years ago and he sound just like him, I wanted to test him by saying the Radio Sport name.
 
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mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Jun 21, 2012
22,810
Mt. Wellington, Auckland
Not getting at Mount Wellington ( I never would ;) :D) but when I first brought up about Allen Mac retiring from Radio Sport he had never heard of him. That sort of hinted to me that Radio Sport was for dinosaurs. The modern generation get their kicks from other places.
Much more of a music guy. The Sound is a great station and definitely in the rotation. Dont really like listening to people waffle on. From sport to politics its a waste of life for mine...
 

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