General NRL Concussion Thread/Head High Tackle

Do you agree with the new high contact rule?

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gREVUS

gREVUS

Long live the Rainbows and Butterflies
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https://www.iflscience.com/brain/more-40-percent-nfl-players-retire-brain-injuries-study-suggests

Read this - it puts it in pretty simple terms and shows that helmets arent helping in the NFL.

More Than 40 Percent Of NFL Players Retire With Brain Injuries, Study Suggests

April 13, 2016 | by Ben Taub

nfl.jpg

photo credit: Many players suffer multiple concussions during their careers. Eugene Onischenko/Shutterstock
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Amid mounting concerns over the health of pro football players, a new study has shown that as many as 40 percent of retired NFL superstars could be suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI). Set to be announced at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology in Vancouver, the study will come as another blow to lovers of the game, which has recently seen something of an exodus of top players fearing for their long-term health.

While top NFL officials have pointed out that risk is ever-present in life, and that the prospect of injury is a worthwhile price for the thrill of the contest, increasing awareness of the dangers of TBI is causing many to think twice about donning a helmet and stepping onto the gridiron.

TBI is an umbrella term covering a spectrum of cognitive disorders resulting from blows to the head. Many of these are difficult to detect, partly because the marks they leave on the brain don’t show up in regular functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans. However, in a recent study involving war veterans who had received blows to the head while on duty, researchers found that signs of long-term brain damage could be detected using a technique called diffusion tensor imaging (DTI).

DTI measures the movement of water molecules through a type of brain tissue called white matter, allowing scientists to pinpoint any areas where the flow is disrupted due to structural damage. Researchers, therefore, decided to use this technique to study the brains of 40 retired NFL players, who had played an average of seven seasons in the sport’s elite league, suffering an average of around eight concussions each during their careers.

nfl%20helmet.jpg


Even helmets can't always protect players from brain injuries. dean bertoncelj/Shutterstock

While 12 of these former athletes showed evidence of TBI on traditional MRI scans, 17 were found to be suffering from the condition once DTI was used. This represents a staggering 43 percent of the overall cohort.

Even more alarming is the fact that some of the participants who returned healthy scans actually showed evidence of cognitive impairment when conducting thinking and memory tests. Overall, 50 percent of ex-pros were found to have problems with executive function – which refers to general problem-solving skills – while 45 percent had learning and memory deficits.

Putting these results into perspective, study author Francis Conidi explained in a statementthat “the rate of traumatic brain injury was significantly higher in the players than that found in the general population.”

Despite the fact that NFL players wear state-of-the-art helmets, scientists are beginning to realise that these are only effective at protecting the skull, but cannot prevent players’ brains from “sloshing” around inside their heads when they take a big hit. In the face of growing evidence regarding the dangers of these types of impacts, NFL commissioner Rob Goodall was recently left with no choice but to publically accept the link between football and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a cognitive disorder that develops from TBI.

In light of this, a number of high-profile players have recently turned their backs on the sport despite apparently having their best playing years still ahead of them. Chris Borland of the San Francisco 49ers, for example, retired last year at the age of 24, and has since been followed by the likes of 23-year-old Buffalo Bills linebacker A.J. Tarpley and 30-year-old Detroit Lions superstar wide receiver Calvin Johnson.
 
surfin

surfin

The thing with NFL is there are alot of whiplash type tackles as the defenders can come from all directions, often blindsiding the ball carrier, plus there is also a history of leading with the head and using the helmet as part of the tackle.
 
mt.wellington

mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Knights coach Nathan Brown says rival NRL clubs break concussion rules
Last updated 16:46, April 17 2016
1460868375745.jpg

IAN HITCHCOCK/GETTY IMAGES
Jarrod Mullen was one of the players taken off against the Broncos.

Almost a year to the day after concussion rules were tightened, Newcastle coach Nathan Brown says NRL rivals are making a mockery of it and that his club is being punished for following it.

Brown and rival coach Wayne Bennett called for greater player welfare after Newcastle were reduced to 14 fit men in Saturday night's 53-0 loss in Brisbane. Brown became the latest coach to berate the NRL for not allowing clubs extra substitutes to replace players who are ruled out during matches through concussion.

"The NRL has to address this concussion rule," Brown said after Newcastle lost Jarrod Mullen, Tyler Randell and Nathan Ross to head knocks, leaving the Knights with a makeshift backline that featured Jacob Saifiti in the centres and Sione Mata'utia at five-eighth.

"If we are going to go down this path we need to have more players. We should have an 18th and 19th man.

"We go to the letter by ruling people out but we are getting punished, forced to leave young kids out on the field and it's unfair for their development."

Brown said while Newcastle follow concussion protocols, other clubs were exploiting the guidelines."There are people out there who are bending it," he said. "You watch some players who come back on, or stay on and are shielded. Then there's the other case where guys are deliberately lying down and using a head knock to get a free interchange.

"There's a mockery being made of it at the minute. I don't think I am the only coach sitting here saying it."

At one stage debutant Josh King was the only man left on the Knights bench. Last April the Australian Rugby League Commission stiffened concussion rules, ensuring any player showing symptoms stay off the field for the rest of the game.

"In the end it wasn't a good spectacle (against Brisbane). I don't think we are going the right way about it at the moment."

It was already a subject close to Brown's heart after Newcastle winger James McManus announced in February he would sit out the 2016 season due to concussion.

The former NSW flyer has not taken the field since round 20 2015, when he copped his second head knock of the season and collapsed near the sidelines against South Sydney.

Brown was unsure whether his concussed trio would be cleared to play for their next clash against Manly on April 25.

"With a nine-day turnaround you'd hope they'd be OK but I can't say," he said.

Bennett, meanwhile, was unimpressed about an incident in which Mata'utia injured Brisbane forward Alex Glenn with his knee in a tackle.

"Alex copped a pretty bad knee," Bennett said.

"That's about the third one that's happened to us this year. I think the game will have to start looking at some of that stuff. Your knee is a pretty lethal part of your body and if it's used in the wrong manner then it can have a huge impact.

"Some liability needs to be put on the player that comes in there and drops his knee so that he doesn't do something like that … they are getting away with it and they aren't getting charged for it. It will continue if that keeps happening.

"I'm not saying that it was deliberately done to Alex tonight, but I do think it could have been avoided. I think that's why we need to put some more pressure on the player to not drop their knee. We've done it with players putting unnecessary pressure on kickers and I think this should be looked at as well."

Newcastle forward Pauli Pauli was put on report for a high tackle on Brisbane's Joe Ofahengaue.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/leagu...n-says-rival-nrl-clubs-break-concussion-rules
 
snake77

snake77

Former NSW Origin winger James McManus sues Newcastle Knights over concussions
ADRIAN PROSZENKO

Last updated 11:17, February 26 2017

  • Brain surgeon urges NRL to trial concussion sensors
    * Is it possible to compare the risk on the rugby field to climbing a mountain?
    * Cost of sporting injuries hit half billion, ACC figures show

    Knights chairman Brian McGuigan said the club respected McManus' right to sue, but would be defending its handling of his concussions.

    "Players have got to be approved to go back on the ground by the doctors, the medical staff," McGuigan told Fairfax Media.

    "If he is deemed to be fit, all we do is abide by that, all we have ever done is abide by that. We have never put anyone under pressure to go back on the field were they not approved by the medical staff as being ready to go back on the field.

    "In Newcastle we have a very good screening operation, together with Hunter Area Health for those concussion incidents.

    "We think we have not done anything wrong and would certainly not do anything wrong by any of the players and ask them to do anything that was untoward to their long-standing health condition."

    McManus attended the Knights' season launch on Friday night and his legal action won't alter his employment at the club.

    "We have not changed his status at all," McGuigan said.

    "From his point of view, he needs to look to his long-term wellbeing. If he and his doctors think he has had some injury, then he has a right to sue. But at the same time, we deny any responsibility on the basis that our doctors said he was OK to return to the field.

    "We would never contemplate forcing anyone to go back onto the field. We are doing everything in step with what we should do in a legal sense to make sure we protect the club and the NRL against such action because we believe we have no case to answer."

    The development is yet another off-season blow for the embattled Knights, who are still reeling from Jarrod Mullen's positive drugs test, the departure of Korbin Sims to Brisbane and a car accident that will sideline forward Pauli Pauli indefinitely.

    The NRL owns the wooden spooners and is struggling to attract a suitable buyer. News of a lawsuit, one that legal experts predict could result in a seven-figure payout should McManus win his case, is unlikely to help attract prospective owners.

    In its injury surveillance report, the NRL noted an increase in head-injury assessments from 210 in 2015 to 276 in 2016. Sixty-six per cent of those cases were cleared to continue playing in 2016, compared to 54 per cent in 2015. A strengthening of concussion protocols has been credited for the increase in assessments.

    The NRL was contacted for comment but a spokesperson said it was a matter for the Knights.

    The NFL will soon be in a position to begin paying out nearly $1 billion to retired players following an historic concussion settlement. More than 4500 retired NFL players accused the league of covering up the long-term health risks of football-related head trauma in the original class action.

    McGuigan conceded the case could have widespread ramifications for rugby league.

    "You could contemplate that would be a serious impact for the code and any code really," McGuigan said. "We showed we are responsible because we stopped his playing."

    - Sydney Morning Herald
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/leagu...manus-sues-newcastle-knights-over-concussions
 
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snake77

snake77

James McManus hopes concussion case will help protect future players
ADRIAN PROSZENKO

Last updated 13:08, February 26 2017

  • Former NSW Origin winger James McManus sues Newcastle Knights over concussions
    * Brain surgeon urges NRL to trial concussion sensors
    * Is it possible to compare the risk on the rugby field to climbing a mountain?

    "There could be some ground-breaking things here," McManus told Fairfax Media.

    "I'd like to think with the information that is available and things like this [claim], the right action will be taken in the future and it will protect players against things like brain damage.

    "It's one of those things where I know players are suffering with things and are probably unaware that concussions are the cause of it.

    "It's trauma, it's brain trauma. It creates other issues you may not be aware of.

    "You don't want to be in the position where you are the first to do something, but I think things have to change in the game, there's no doubt about that.

    "It will be what it's going to be."

    McManus made all 166 of his NRL appearances for the Knights and continues to be employed by the club in an off-field role.

    "I guess this is an issue about my playing career," he said.

    "The club has been great in assisting me through my professional transition. I'm committed to still being part of the place. I love Newcastle, I love the fact that I played for the one club. Obviously the issue is before the court and I can't comment much there.

    "I guess it's protecting my future and the future of my family. It's had a significant impact on my life and that's why I've gone down the path I've gone.

    "In saying that, the club has been very professional in its approach in the way we're working through this thing together.

    "I am committed to make money for the club and present a great position on what sort of a club it is. But this matter was in my playing career."

    Knights chairman Brian McGuigan said the parties would continue to work together co-operatively until an outcome was reached.

    "He's a good bloke, he's given us great service and we will continue to employ him," McGuigan said.

    "We have no axe to grind against him because he is seeking some compensation from us for things he or his lawyers didn't think we did right.

    "Rest assured, we are very strict about looking after our players. We love our players and do the right thing by them. We have always done that and will always do that."

    The McManus case is one of three potentially game-changing lawsuits under way in rugby league. Former Sharks, Rabbitohs, Dragons and Storm forward Michael Greenfield is suing the Australian Rugby League Commission over a shoulder charge that prematurely ended his career in 2012. And Newcastle forward Alex McKinnon has indicated he will consider legal action against the NRL and Melbourne for the tackle that ended his career and resulted in a catastrophic spinal injury.

    The NRL has a set of concussion protocols in place that are being reviewed as new updates in research and technology become available. Leading brain surgeon Dr Richard Parkinson has been in discussions with head office about using small impact sensors behind a player's ear to curb the confusion about the long-term impacts of concussion.

    The girlfriend of former player Chad Robinson, Rani Morris, said the former Eels and Roosters forward believed his depression was triggered by the multiple head knocks suffered during his playing career.

    "He often wondered if his mental illness was brought on by head injuries from being tackled head-on over the years and he had struggled with depression for years," Morris told News Corp after Robinson was found dead in a crashed car in December.

    - Sydney Morning Herald
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/leagu...cussion-case-will-help-protect-future-players
 
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snake77

snake77

A lot of talk about concussions over the last few years and a lot of emphasis from sports has been made on how they deal with concussions.

There has also been talk after seeing what is happening in the states that at some point a player or a group of players would sue a sport or sporting organization. The talk has always been the NRL preparing for this in the future. This is a little different in that he is suing the club.

Also a bit of a weird situation in that he is working for the club and enjoying it and grateful but suing them at the same time. Then on the other side the Knights seem fine with that. When the Alex McKinnon suing the NRL speculation started it was listed that he'd stand down from the roles he was offered in order to be able to sue the NRL.
 
Johnnyray

Johnnyray

Another reason why they need to introduce football helmets into game. Again I know it's not going to reduce any real damage but it will help to stem some of more serious concussion you can get from player contact. Not only that but they're cool as fuck ...
 
mt.wellington

mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Another reason why they need to introduce football helmets into game. Again I know it's not going to reduce any real damage but it will help to stem some of more serious concussion you can get from player contact. Not only that but they're cool as fuck ...
Football helmets only made the NFL worse. Certainly not the answer.

Apart from turning it into touch there really isnt much one can do about it but suspend people who make contact with the head, get every player a head check annually, deregister anyone who fails and making sure the sideline tests are more comprehensive. People like Ryan Hoffman should be deregistered...
 
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Johnnyray

Johnnyray

Football helmets only made the NFL worse. Certainly not the answer.

Apart from turning it into touch there really isnt much one can do about it but suspend people who make contact with the head, get every player a head check annually, deregister anyone who fails and making sure the sideline tests are more comprehensive. People like Ryan Hoffman should be deregistered...

Yeah you are right but only in sense that what happened was alot of people wearing them over years got tricked into thinking that it made game safe and that you're not going get hurt or suffer from any sort of head damage with one on. It's that kind of thinking that wearing a helmet made you invincible is what led to things like smash mouth college football going on for alot longer than it should. I'm not saying that wearing a football helmet will stop you from getting concussion but it will help reduce number of them happening in game, much more than not wearing anything at all...

:)
 
eudebrito

eudebrito

|-|
Contributor
I'm not saying that wearing a football helmet will stop you from getting concussion but it will help reduce number of them happening in game, much more than not wearing anything at all...

Nah can you imagine what James Graham would do wearing a helmet, he’s used his unprotected swede enough times as weapon already.

Apart from turning it into touch there really isnt much one can do about it but suspend people who make contact with the head, get every player a head check annually, deregister anyone who fails and making sure the sideline tests are more comprehensive. People like Ryan Hoffman should be deregistered...
Probably won’t be long before the NRL does what union did and anything that makes contact near the head is a penalty and anything that isn’t a pure accident is a yellow / red card. Well,

Marty Taupau clocking jack bird in the back of the head, should really be red card, 6 weeks suspension, directly affecting teams wins and losses, that’s the only way to limit it. There was no talk of reviewing the incompetent judiciary over the offseason was there?

And have an 18th man for concussion subs, not that the warriors are as guilty as some teams, but every single team has had someone come back on after looking groggy, pretty sure Nathan Friend had one for us a cpl years ago.
 
gREVUS

gREVUS

Long live the Rainbows and Butterflies
Contributor
A lot of talk about concussions over the last few years and a lot of emphasis from sports has been made on how they deal with concussions.

There has also been talk after seeing what is happening in the states that at some point a player or a group of players would sue a sport or sporting organization. The talk has always been the NRL preparing for this in the future. This is a little different in that he is suing the club.

Also a bit of a weird situation in that he is working for the club and enjoying it and grateful but suing them at the same time. Then on the other side the Knights seem fine with that. When the Alex McKinnon suing the NRL speculation started it was listed that he'd stand down from the roles he was offered in order to be able to sue the NRL.

in australia it is often not the individual suing the club but an insurance company on their behalf, which often the individual has no say in if they want to continue treatment. The suit is named for the individual rather than the company as it looks bad on the company. Most of these turn into out of court settlements as they are just between insurance companies.

Given mental health issues can continue for the rest of his life the company might be looking to get him a pay out, make their bucks and then leave him to it. Or it could just be hes just getting greedy, i have no individual knowledge of this case.
 
gREVUS

gREVUS

Long live the Rainbows and Butterflies
Contributor
Yeah you are right but only in sense that what happened was alot of people wearing them over years got tricked into thinking that it made game safe and that you're not going get hurt or suffer from any sort of head damage with one on. It's that kind of thinking that wearing a helmet made you invincible is what led to things like smash mouth college football going on for alot longer than it should. I'm not saying that wearing a football helmet will stop you from getting concussion but it will help reduce number of them happening in game, much more than not wearing anything at all...

:)
Helmets have been banned from amature boxing recently for exactly the reason you specified. They call theirs head gear, but its still a helmet. Long term studies now show a correlation between wearing head gear and greater chances of head damage. They think the main reason is that because someone has head gear on the opposition dont pull their punches at all and the refs let them away with it. i think we talked about this before the Rio Olympics as that was when the new rule first came down.

I know in Karate the juniors still have to wear helmets in Australia, but i wonder if Karate Aus are leaving themselves open to a lawsuit for making kids wear helmets. I cant see any other organisation bringing them in given the US lawsuits.
 
gREVUS

gREVUS

Long live the Rainbows and Butterflies
Contributor
Marty Taupau clocking jack bird in the back of the head, should really be red card, 6 weeks suspension, directly affecting teams wins and losses, that’s the only way to limit it. There was no talk of reviewing the incompetent judiciary over the offseason was there?

And have an 18th man for concussion subs, not that the warriors are as guilty as some teams, but every single team has had someone come back on after looking groggy, pretty sure Nathan Friend had one for us a cpl years ago.
the 18th man is still an issue in my mind, as i believe that we have already see the opposite of what you mention, where a player is pulled for a supposed injury check to get a free interchange. You would effectively be creating an extra man and an unknown number of interchanges to get him on the field.

Yea they did talk about judiciary inconsistency but the words its a work in progress come to mind. They were more focused on changing the charging for minor offences. And the use of the bunker.
 
Gizzyfan

Gizzyfan

I have nothing to support this but watching QI one day they said that in Boxing there were less deaths in the bare knuckle days as they tended to avoid the head.

What does seem irrefutable is that helmets and shoulder pads makes bigger hits more likely for those making them.
 
mt.wellington

mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Probably won’t be long before the NRL does what union did and anything that makes contact near the head is a penalty and anything that isn’t a pure accident is a yellow / red card. Well,
I'll believe it when I see it. NRL refs are the worst in the world for having a backbone...

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bruce

bruce

Contributor
Football helmets only made the NFL worse. Certainly not the answer.

Apart from turning it into touch there really isnt much one can do about it but suspend people who make contact with the head, get every player a head check annually, deregister anyone who fails and making sure the sideline tests are more comprehensive. People like Ryan Hoffman should be deregistered...
As a former tacklebot I can assure you that tackles cause more concussion and people realise. The fun police will stop the sport next.
 
mt.wellington

mt.wellington

Warriors Orange Peeler
Good to see the NRL take this seriously. Just hope they have the backbone to follow through with it...

Concussion breach notices
Mon 20 Mar, 2017, 1:30pm
Media Release, NRL
image.ashx


Three NRL clubs are facing fines totalling $350,000 after being issued with Breach Notices relating to head injuries in Round 3 of the Telstra Premiership.

CEO Todd Greenberg said there is no more important issue in the game than player safety and he was satisfied that the three clubs had failed to follow the concussion rules during weekend matches.

The Breach Notices have been issued to:

• The Gold Coast Titans ($150,000) for incidents involving Kane Elgey, Joe Greenwood and Ryan Simpkins

• St George Illawarra Dragons ($100,000) for an incident involving Josh Dugan

• Newcastle Knights ($100,000) for an incident involving Brendan Elliot

"These are, by far, the heaviest fines ever proposed by the game for concussion breaches," Mr Greenberg said.

"That is how seriously we take it.

"The clubs involved have the opportunity to respond to the Breach Notices, and we will consider those responses, but our message is clear… we are not going to allow player safety to be put at risk through breaches of the concussion rules."

Mr Greenberg said the NRL has put significant resources into concussion training and education.

"In the majority of cases we see strong compliance with the League's concussion rules but it appears that this did not happen at the weekend in some matches and we cannot stand by and allow player safety to be put at risk," he said.

"Where we believe the rules have been breached we will take action – and we would hope that these Breach Notices will serve as a warning to all clubs."

Mr Greenberg said the clubs would have five business days to respond to the Breach Notices.

https://www.nrl.com/concussion-breach-notices/tabid/10874/newsid/104847/default.aspx
 
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Inruin

Inruin

Contributor
Good to see the NRL take this seriously. Just hope they have the backbone to follow through with it...

Concussion breach notices
Mon 20 Mar, 2017, 1:30pm
Media Release, NRL
image.ashx


Three NRL clubs are facing fines totalling $350,000 after being issued with Breach Notices relating to head injuries in Round 3 of the Telstra Premiership.

CEO Todd Greenberg said there is no more important issue in the game than player safety and he was satisfied that the three clubs had failed to follow the concussion rules during weekend matches.

The Breach Notices have been issued to:

• The Gold Coast Titans ($150,000) for incidents involving Kane Elgey, Joe Greenwood and Ryan Simpkins

• St George Illawarra Dragons ($100,000) for an incident involving Josh Dugan

• Newcastle Knights ($100,000) for an incident involving Brendan Elliot

"These are, by far, the heaviest fines ever proposed by the game for concussion breaches," Mr Greenberg said.

"That is how seriously we take it.

"The clubs involved have the opportunity to respond to the Breach Notices, and we will consider those responses, but our message is clear… we are not going to allow player safety to be put at risk through breaches of the concussion rules."

Mr Greenberg said the NRL has put significant resources into concussion training and education.

"In the majority of cases we see strong compliance with the League's concussion rules but it appears that this did not happen at the weekend in some matches and we cannot stand by and allow player safety to be put at risk," he said.

"Where we believe the rules have been breached we will take action – and we would hope that these Breach Notices will serve as a warning to all clubs."

Mr Greenberg said the clubs would have five business days to respond to the Breach Notices.

https://www.nrl.com/concussion-breach-notices/tabid/10874/newsid/104847/default.aspx
that Josh Dugan one is the only one I saw. The ref stopped the game. He looked out to it. In the instance where a ref has to stop the game because they are worried about a players safety, why is it not automatically a replacement made and the player has to undergo off field testing?
 

Jordan G

Guest
The Elliott one was so obvious. That was the Hunt high tackle. Was out before he hit the ground.

Seems like backs get more leniancy from some clubs. Is that because they have special brains or just a lot harder to replace?

Hope the NRL continues to crack down.
 
Dixpat

Dixpat

In Stacey we (have to) trust
Contributor
Now that the NRL has made it very clear that a player must go off for a concussion test then I believe that the free interchange needs to be scrapped.

On Saturday in the Titans game Ryan James went off under the guise of a head assessment but was back on the field in a very short time - too short in my opinion for a proper assessment & a rort of the interchange

A head injury should be treated no differently than any other injury where a player needs to be interchanged
 

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