Nightingale & Manu seemingly done their dash any chances the Kiwis can nab Suliasi Vunivalu?

2.Vunivalu 5.Rapana. Be a pretty good wing pairing for the Kiwis. In form wingers of the comp.
 
Only if he bothered getting a NZ passport while he was here...

I hope he's got his passport sorted he'd walk into the Kiwis on current form he's a big boy that can handle the physicality, footy smarts, athleticism, agility, skill, wicked finishing he's got it all.

Meninga shamelessly selected Radradra in the Anzac test using that 'better money for the family' excuse don't see why Kearney can't select Vunivalu at least he came through a NZ playing system.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mt.wellington
NRL: Change lets players switch nations
Source: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/sport/news/article.cfm?c_id=4&objectid=11711937


International league is headed for one of the biggest shake-ups in the history of the sport.

A radical eligibility proposal - which will change the equation for the nations outside the big three of Australia, New Zealand and England - has been approved by the Rugby League International Federation.

The Herald on Sunday can reveal:

• Eligible players can nominate one tier one nation to represent and one tier two nation.

• Players can switch between their two countries multiple times within a World Cup cycle.

• There is no stand-down between a change of allegiance.

• Players of Polynesian heritage can play State of Origin but still be available to turn out for their native island country.

It's a big move. League has always had a chequered history with eligibility - mainly due to the professional base of the sport being limited to two countries - but it feels like this is the best solution so far.

It's not perfect, but it's pragmatic. It will stop any unnecessary lockout of players from international football, as happened in the past when Polynesian players (in particular) had represented a major nation and then were not selected for the next campaign. It will also stop the major nations - intentionally or otherwise - hoarding the best talent.

It means the likes of Samoa, Tonga, Fiji and Papua New Guinea can field their best possible line-ups. Warriors utility Tui Lolohea and Roosters second-rower Sio Siua Taukeiaho starred for Tonga in their 2015 Pacific test win over Samoa, then were selected for the Kiwis tour of England last November. That made them unavailable for Tonga in May, even though the duo had not been selected for the Kiwis' Anzac test on the same weekend.

It will also take some of the heartache and angst away for players like Solomone Kata and David Fusitua, who have played for Tonga in the past but are currently in the Kiwis train-on squad for the Four Nations. In the past there has been considerable pressure on some players, torn between the wishes of their families and their personal aspirations.

Anthony Milford was another example. He turned down the opportunity to play for Samoa earlier this year because of his ambitions to play for Queensland, and eventually the Kangaroos. Now the two are no longer mutually exclusive. There are no changes to the specific Origin eligibility laws but opting to chase the Origin riches no longer rules players out of representing their Pacific heritage.

However, the status quo remains for Origin-eligible New Zealanders (like Kieran Foran or Jason Taumalolo); they won't be eligible for the interstate extravaganza once they represent the Kiwis.

Players will be able to make multiple changes of allegiance during a cycle, but only up and down the pyramid. There is no option to switch between the big three, as in the farcical Tonie Carroll example.

"In the past, the top three nations have monopolised the talent," said the NRL's international development manager Tas Baitieri. "The island nations, in particular, haven't been able to pick their possible teams."

Even minnows could benefit. There are 10 current NRL players with Serbian heritage, including Manly's Trbojevic brothers, who could help Serbia's qualification attempt for the 2017 World Cup.

"We welcome the changes," said 2017 World Cup CEO Andrew Hill. "They will allow more elite players to play and also help bridge the gap between the top three nations and the next tier."

Next change to happen in my opinion will be allowing Kiwi eligible players to play SOO and for the Kiwis.
 
Next change to happen in my opinion will be allowing Kiwi eligible players to play SOO and for the Kiwis.
Idk, it would be nice to think so but the reality is the Kangaroos & ARL have just bolstered their ranks and they're not likely to give us a leg up on them. Now more than ever the RLIF need to look to the USA and actually grow the game, that will benefit us Kiwis imo..
 
One-day international league bonanza


image.ashx


Rugby league's foothold in new and exciting territories will be showcased on February 4 when four international matches are held back-to-back at Liverpool All Saints, in Sydney's west.

The day will feature full 80-minute, 13-a-side men's matches between Chile and Poland, El Salvador and Thailand, Uruguay and Hungary, and Peru and Africa United.

For Uruguay, Peru and Poland, the event will herald their debuts in full-length matches against sovereign nations.

It will also be the first time Hungary and Poland have played a full match outside of Europe.

Earlier games are set to feature a combined Latin American under 17 team against similarly-aged rivals from Africa United, and a team representing the nations of the Incan Empire (Tawantinsuyu) facing Sydney University.

"We think fans will love the event as a way to kick-off a year in which the 2017 Rugby League World Cup and the proposed Emerging Nations World Championship come to Australasia," Latin American Rugby League president Daniel Godinez said.

"To have communities from Latin America, Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe all converging to celebrate a game that was unknown by them a few decades ago is a real positive for the sport.

"None of these teams is ranked in the top 20 at the moment, but I believe it's only a matter of time before one breaks through.

"I can remember people doubting Sri Lanka would ever be a force in international cricket not that long ago and they've since become world champions in multiple forms of the game."

In the latest Rugby League international Federation rankings Chile is listed 34th, Hungary is 38th and El Salvador is 39th, with the other nations recognised by the RLIF, but as-yet unranked.

For Godinez, who arrived in Australia as a childhood refugee and spent several months in Villawood Immigration Centre, the ability of rugby league to put nations such as his homeland El Salvador on the map is something special.

"I'm sure a lot of people don't realise, but El Salvador has not made a FIFA World Cup for 35 years, and the rugby union team has been heavily beaten in recent times," he said.

"It's a tough country full of tough people and rugby league has a real opportunity to create attention if we continue to build on recent foundations.

"For each of the teams competing on February 4, we hope this is a positive way for their people to unify and show strength on the world stage in another pursuit."

Two brand new jerseys featuring the tribal markings of their respective cultures will be displayed by Peru and the Tawantinsuyu team.

Peruvian front-rower Juan Carlos Carrion was chief designer of his team's kit, while Ecuadoran forward Rodney Garcia conceptualised the Tawantinsuyu strip.

"I have Incan heritage via my father's side and it's something I'm quite proud of," Garcia said.

"The team to play Sydney University will have players from all the nations that today reflect the extent of the Incan empire – from Colombia and Ecuador in the north, down to Bolivia, Peru, Chile and Argentina.

"I've had the honour of captaining Ecuador before, but this will be a special moment too."

Tickets to the day will be $15 for adults or $25 for a family (two adults and two children), with proceeds split between the competing nations for future grassroots development.

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 4, LIVERPOOL ALL SAINTS, Hillier Oval, Memorial Avenue, Liverpool.
1:15pm Latin Heat U17 v Africa United U17
2:30pm Incans (Tawantinsuyu) v Sydney University
4pm Peru v Africa United
5:30pm Uruguay v Hungary
7pm El Salvador v Thailand
8.30pm Chile v Poland

https://www.nrl.com/one-day-international-league-bonanza/tabid/10874/newsid/103023/default.aspx
 
Thai's are not designed to play league, please stop now. Africans are though. League could do worse than promote the sport in the poorer areas of SA. Must be talent there. Soccer has done well throughout Africa, rugby is in disarray.
 

matiunz

This year yet?
Contributor
Thai's are not designed to play league, please stop now. Africans are though. League could do worse than promote the sport in the poorer areas of SA. Must be talent there. Soccer has done well throughout Africa, rugby is in disarray.

In theory South Africa could produce a pretty decent League team- Problem is union (and by extension league) is still largely seen as the sport of the minority whites. Union in that country is being torn apart by politics and racial quotas forcing a large number of their top players to chase the $$$ in Europe and we are seeing this have a massively negative impact on the quality,
Sadly league would face a similar fate and would be tough to establish.
 

bruce

Contributor
Thai's are not designed to play league, please stop now.
Shaun Johnson is half Thai:bookworm:...they are actually quite tough bastards...believe it or not...the more important point it is so bloody hot there they don't even have much interest in any of the winter codes. There is some rugby union at the universities in Bangkok, but very little.
In theory South Africa could produce a pretty decent League team
A South African rugby league team toured NZ way back in the 1960s. They were all ex union players who had joined English league clubs. Remember rugby was strictly amateur back then. Sorry to sound pessimistic but I cannot see rugby league taking off in South Africa unless some of the coalminers get interested in the history of the game. The only bigger wankfest than international rugby union is international rugby league.
 
A South African rugby league team toured NZ way back in the 1960s. They were all ex union players who had joined English league clubs. Remember rugby was strictly amateur back then. Sorry to sound pessimistic but I cannot see rugby league taking off in South Africa unless some of the coalminers get interested in the history of the game. The only bigger wankfest than international rugby union is international rugby league
Tiaan Strauss was a player I admired, he was very much in the mould of Kevin Campion. It's a shame RL has been suppressed in SA, they are without a doubt built for the game. Bill Burgoyne used to harp on about them and even went on a couple of missions their to spread the good word.
Perhaps with the SARU falling apart somewhat there is an opportunity to encourage swapping codes and signing a big name SA player, I wonder which Springboks would go well in the NRL?
 

kiwi's 13-6

Guest
International League at amateur level has spread far and wide... 30 years ago in 1987 when i got into this game it was only played in England, Australia, New Zealand, France, PNG & I think comps in Cook Islands, Tonga, Samoa were just getting started. The game is now played at amateur level with domestic competitions in 40 countries including Fiji, Lebanon, Serbia, Spain, USA, Canada, Jamaica, Malta, Russia.... At Fully professional level it is the same 3 main countries Oz, NZ & England its always been but when you look below the surface internationally at amateur level the games been spreading like wildfire... recently small competitions have even started in Turkey & Mexico this is not big time sport just 4 or 5 team comps of amateurs but who would have thought that this was even possible 30 years ago?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Like
Reactions: kabkram

bruce

Contributor
Minor correction - half Laotian I believe.
I have posted this before.

Laotians are Thai people, who speak the same language and dialect as the North Eastern provinces of Thailand. The difference between Laos and Thailand was that the French colonised the Laotian part of Siam in 1893.

After Germany invaded France in 1940 Siam (Thailand) invaded Laos to claim the country back. It is a bit (but not exactly) like having people on either side of the Waikato River forming different countries, even though they speak the same language and share the same history.

To put it in another perspective the Thai people originate from Yunan, Xuangxi and Xangzhou in southern China. Over the centuries they emigrated into the hill country and valleys of North Vietnam, Laos, Siam and Myanmar.

Also the Kingdoms of the Isan (Korat) Plateau which Thailand and Laos share, and through which the Mekong flows down to Vietnam and Cambodia were in the past ruled by the Angkor Wat (Cambodian) empire.

What that basically means is there is no significant difference between Lao and Thai people. Thailand is actually a new name for Siam invented after WWII, which is another story.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Defence and kabkram

bruce

Contributor
Tiaan Strauss was a player I admired, he was very much in the mould of Kevin Campion. It's a shame RL has been suppressed in SA, they are without a doubt built for the game. Bill Burgoyne used to harp on about them and even went on a couple of missions their to spread the good word.
Perhaps with the SARU falling apart somewhat there is an opportunity to encourage swapping codes and signing a big name SA player, I wonder which Springboks would go well in the NRL?
Rugby union is a university game steeped in the upper class system of South Africa. League has always been a lower socio economic game. I cannot ever see South Africa taking to rugby league. That is unless the codes join, of which I think there has more chance.
Bill Burgoyne used to talk about lots of things:), especially to the ref when the scrum was forming, god bless him;), I think he has moved to the league club in the sky hasn't he?