5169 Community Cases

17 Deaths

Auckland - 1884
Canterbury - 588
Waikato - 449
Southern - 338
Wellington - 264
Bay of Plenty - 251
Mid Central - 193
Hawkes Bay - 173
Hutt Valley - 164
Northland - 161
Nelson - 154
Taranaki - 126
Lakes - 121
South Canterbury - 81
Whanganui - 75
Wairarapa - 52
West Coast - 48
Tairawhiti - 42
Unknown - 5
 

COVID-19 hospitalisations​

  • COVID-19 Cases in hospital: total number 599: Northland: 36; Waitematā: 59; Counties Manukau: 53; Auckland: 68; Waikato: 60; Bay of Plenty: 23; Lakes: 17; Hawke’s Bay: 35; MidCentral: 21; Whanganui: 16; Taranaki: 12; Tairawhiti: 2; Wairarapa: 7; Capital & Coast: 15; Hutt Valley: 16; Nelson Marlborough: 15; Canterbury: 86; West Coast: 4; South Canterbury: 23; Southern: 31.
  • Weekly COVID-19 Hospitalisations - 7 day rolling average: 630 (This time last week 772)
  • Average age of current COVID-19 hospitalisations: 63
  • Cases in ICU or HDU: 11
  • Vaccination status of new admissions to hospital*: Unvaccinated or not eligible (51 cases); partially immunised <7 days from second dose or have only received one dose (2 cases); double vaccinated at least 7 days before being reported as a case (84 cases); received booster at least 7 days before being reported as a case (322 cases).
 

COVID-19 vaccinations administered​

Vaccinations administered in New Zealand​

  • Vaccines administered to date: 4,029,433 first doses; 3,982,329 second doses; 34,114 third primary doses; 2,711,403 first booster doses: 388,947 second booster doses: 266,282 paediatric first doses and 146,246 paediatric second doses
  • Vaccines administered yesterday: 14 first doses; 31 second doses; 15 third primary doses; 556 first booster doses; 8,481 second booster doses; 28 paediatric first doses and 84 paediatric second doses
 

COVID-19 deaths​

There are now a total of 1,705 deaths confirmed as attributable to COVID-19, either as the underlying cause of death or as a contributing factor. This is the number that will be reported to the World Health Organization as it provides the most accurate assessment of COVID-19 related mortality in New Zealand.

In the past seven days there have been an average of 15 deaths confirmed each day as being attributable to COVID-19. This is a very sad time for whānau and friends of those who have died, and our thoughts and condolences are with them.

Information on the number of new deaths of people with COVID-19 reported to the Ministry of Health in the last 24 hours, and the seven-day rolling average, is available on the Ministry of Health website. This includes information on the age band and location of these newly reported deaths.
 

Update to reported vaccination rates​

As indicated in yesterday’s statement, today’s COVID-19 vaccination data has been updated because of a technical change to vaccine coverage reporting, which means some changes in reported vaccination rates.

These changes are the result of moving to the latest available Health Service User (HSU2021) population dataset to calculate vaccination coverage, which replaces HSU2020 data.

The HSU measures the number of people who have used health services over a 12-month period.

The latest HSU data includes an additional 233,000 people who have been identified as eligible for a vaccination after using health services during the 2021 calendar year, so they were not previously captured in the HSU2020 data.

The update will mean a decrease in overall reported vaccination rates, although the number of people already vaccinated has stayed the same, and will increase as more people become vaccinated.

The decrease in the overall vaccination rate is because although we have the same number of people vaccinated, we are now dividing that number by a larger group of people.
 
4818 Community Cases

21 Deaths

Auckland - 1847
Canterbury - 524
Waikato - 424
Southern - 325
Wellington - 237
Bay of Plenty - 231
Northland - 193
Mid Central - 184
Hutt Valley - 163
Hawkes Bay - 141
Nelson - 116
Taranaki - 97
Lakes - 77
South Canterbury - 64
West Coast - 61
Whanganui - 55
Wairarapa - 49
Tairawhiti - 27
Unknown - 3


For us to be around 5000 mark during the week I think it's safe to say we've ridden through the current wave that we were on, and are out the other side on the way down. It's still high, but not as high as 10,000.

We shall see how the next week or two goes, but from this trend, it looks promising.
 

COVID-19 hospitalisations​

  • COVID-19 Cases in hospital: total number 571: Northland: 24; Waitematā: 59; Counties Manukau: 48; Auckland: 70; Waikato: 61; Bay of Plenty: 24; Lakes: 13; Hawke’s Bay: 36; MidCentral: 16; Whanganui: 12; Taranaki: 11; Tairawhiti: 2; Wairarapa: 9; Capital & Coast: 14; Hutt Valley: 15; Nelson Marlborough: 12; Canterbury: 95 ; West Coast: 3; South Canterbury: 19; Southern: 28.
  • Weekly COVID-19 Hospitalisations - 7 day rolling average: 617 (This time last week 748)
  • Average age of current COVID-19 hospitalisations: 62
  • Cases in ICU or HDU: 13
  • Vaccination status of new admissions to hospital*: Unvaccinated or not eligible (54 cases); partially immunised <7 days from second dose or have only received one dose (2 cases); double vaccinated at least 7 days before being reported as a case (73 cases); received booster at least 7 days before being reported as a case (302 cases).

We are starting to drop below 600 a day, which is also good news. Still too high. But it's dropping.
 

Vaccinations administered in New Zealand​

  • Vaccines administered to date: 4,029,457 first doses; 3,982,360 second doses; 34,134 third primary doses; 2,711,944 first booster doses: 397,479 second booster doses: 266,307 paediatric first doses and 146,344 paediatric second doses
  • Vaccines administered yesterday: 34 first doses; 34 second doses; 21 third primary doses; 525 first booster doses; 8,495 second booster doses; 23 paediatric first doses and 97 paediatric second doses
  • More detailed information, including vaccine uptake by District, is available on the Ministry’s website.
 

COVID-19 deaths​

There are now a total of 1,726 deaths confirmed as attributable to COVID-19, either as the underlying cause of death or as a contributing factor. This is the number that will be reported to the World Health Organization as it provides the most accurate assessment of COVID-19 related mortality in New Zealand.

In the past seven days there have been an average of 12 deaths confirmed each day as being attributable to COVID-19. This is a very sad time for whānau and friends of those who have died, and our thoughts and condolences are with them.

Information on the number of new deaths of people with COVID-19 reported to the Ministry of Health in the last 24 hours, and the seven-day rolling average, is available on the Ministry of Health website. This includes information on the age band and location of these newly reported deaths.
 
Just a quick update to my statement when I said I had changed my way of updating the daily stats to my spreadsheet, where I said it got to the stage where it took 2 hours a day to do them. Since I went to the new system over the last 3 days, it's only taken up to 20 to 30 minutes to double check everything, making sure everything is in the right order.

That's working out well. Way better than 2 hours. I shaved an hour and a half off my time. Should have thought about it ages ago.

I'm really happy now.
 

Jane Clifton: Why the Government is dragging its feet on a Covid inquiry​

OPINION:

An inquiry into the Government's response to the pandemic would be instructive, but it's a matter of timing. By Jane Clifton.


The trouble with political post-mortems is that they're never done on corpses. Those being dissected are very much alive.

The real purpose of any politician who advocates a formal review of how important issues and crises have been handled is to inflict on those who did the handling as slow and painful a public torturing as possible.

Still, it's hard to contradict National's call for inquiries into both the Government's pandemic stewardship and the Reserve Bank's fielding of the downstream monetary challenges. The pandemic was not only an unprecedented experience in modern times, but one which, epidemiologists assure us, we'd better get used to having more of. As for inflation, it's such a destructive global affliction, the more expert analysis of what's working to conquer it and what isn't, the better.

Trouble is, we can no longer trust ourselves to treat such inquiries as important learning tools. Rather, they've become shrill blame-fests. We can't just blame combative politicians for this. The media rewards conflict with more airtime and column space than it does iterations of common sense and best practice. Social media provides a ceaseless clamour from members of the public for heads to roll, in all conflicting directions.

The Government has accepted the need for a formal public inquiry into the pandemic response, but remains understandably evasive about when it should happen. It fairly argues that with new Covid variants raging and other winter ailments made extra severe as a result of lockdown-depressed immunity levels, this isn't the time. Most experts are still too busy with the crisis to review and reflect.

Another way of putting this is, "For pity's sake, not before the election." Labour would get comprehensively kicked around on its Covid response record – as would most other administrations the world over – because so many pandemic actions went wrong through blameless and unavoidable ignorance, rather than the more usual cause: incompetence.

It's easy to forget that public support for those seat-of-the-pants efforts was overwhelming at the time, to the point of fan-mania. The fact that a frightened population grew a little too starry-eyed about being "saved" by the Government and bureaucracy is now causing reflexive embarrassment and a will to lash out. Not a constructive environment for devising a sober charter of how to do better next time.

The alternative of having the formal inquiry after the election is equally unedifying. If National defeats the Government, it will be one long stomping dance on Labour's grave. If Labour hangs on to power, many in the public will feel the exercise to be cynically post-facto.

Even with the strongest arm's-length approach of a judge-led royal commission, the eventual findings would be booted around political gutters like so many hacky-sacks.

Clear-sighted experts would distil useful lessons from the wash-up, but it's always politicians who decide the policies, to an inevitable soundtrack of gloating and catastrophising.

Cut-price pandemic​

The horizon for a post-mortem on the Reserve Bank is scarcely rosier. Although a country's monetary stance is a sovereign right, few countries are even close to being masters of their own destiny. Global currency, commodity and capital interplays are especially beyond the influence of the central bank of a country of five million.

Monetary policy has become a form of religion to certain people – some qualified, others prone to quackery. The more we've refined our legislation to codify and set parameters around liquidity, the more backseat drivers have queued to boast that they could do it better. These savants now nearly outnumber armchair All Blacks coaches.

We've even got former Reserve Bank governors Don Brash and Graeme Wheeler weighing in with belated advice, which is almost unseemly – a bit like a chorus of former pontiffs chipping in to correct the sitting Pope.

This writer pretends to zero expertise on liquidity management, but can confidently make this assertion: whatever the bank did, whenever it did it and whenever it stopped doing it, it would have been subject to fair criticism that it had got it wrong. There were no "right" answers during the pandemic, and the chances of getting consensus on which responses were more wrong than others are pretty slim.

Again, it's easy to forget that, during 2020-21, experts feared massive business and employment collapse almost as much as grave illness and death. Monetary and fiscal measures cushioned economies world-wide. The subsequent invoice of crushing inflation seems steep, but hindsighted smugness needs to consider the counterfactuals. What would looser lockdowns and flintier monetary and fiscal responses have cost in businesses, jobs and lives, and the social fabric?

Should National get its Reserve Bank inquiry, one finding is guaranteed: there's no such thing as a cut-price pandemic.

In the friend zone​

Meanwhile, New Zealand's endless recalibration of its relationship with China is beginning to resemble the old Friends sitcom. Thanks to the previous Labour Government's ground-breaking free trade deal, we became an item. Under National, which couldn't get enough Chinese investment, we were practically married.

Last term, the then-foreign minister, Winston Peters, decided we'd grown over-dependent on China and should go on a break. He thought we should see more of our old American sweetheart, whom we'd rather snubbed during past episodes, not least "The One About Anzus" and "The One About Helen Clark's Non-Aligned Foreign Policy".

Though Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern tactfully pretended not to have heard Peters at the time, China's subsequent heavy petting of the Pacific nations this term recently prompted her to make a similar suggestion. China then became very emotional with us. So last week, Ardern clarified that we're still BFFs, and that will never change, even though we do want to see other people.

This was met with huge relief by the foreign affairs-speaking community and exporters, but their joy was short-lived, because then we got "The One Where Nancy Pops In". US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi just went and romanced Taiwan. Although not sanctioned by her government, her advances were taken as a hostile intervention by China, which insists Taiwan belongs to it. Cue ostentatious military hovering from China, and a new seam of geopolitical dread.

US diplomats are now trying to configure something soothing out of two classic Friends lines: "It was only one night, and it didn't mean anything," and, "But we still have feelings for Taiwan."

 
4126 Community Cases

7 Deaths

Auckland - 1566
Canterbury - 496
Waikato - 356
Southern - 251
Bay of Plenty - 191
Wellington - 183
Mid Central - 145
Nelson - 132
Northland - 132
Hutt Valley - 130
Hawkes Bay - 108
Taranaki - 97
Lakes - 80
South Canterbury - 74
Wairarapa - 55
Tairawhiti - 53
Whanganui - 48
West Coast - 24
Unknown - 5
 

COVID-19 deaths​

There are now a total of 1,733 deaths confirmed as attributable to COVID-19, either as the underlying cause of death or as a contributing factor. This is the number that will be reported to the World Health Organization as it provides the most accurate assessment of COVID-19 related mortality in New Zealand.

In the past seven days there have been an average of 12 deaths confirmed each day as being attributable to COVID-19. This is a very sad time for whānau and friends of those who have died, and our thoughts and condolences are with them.

Information on the number of new deaths of people with COVID-19 reported to the Ministry of Health in the last 24 hours, and the seven-day rolling average, is available on the Ministry of Health website. This includes information on the age band and location of these newly reported deaths.
 

COVID-19 hospitalisations​

  • COVID-19 Cases in hospital: total number 549: Northland: 31; Waitematā: 61; Counties Manukau: 51; Auckland: 61; Waikato: 62; Bay of Plenty: 21; Lakes: 5; Hawke’s Bay: 40; MidCentral: 13; Whanganui: 11; Taranaki: 8; Tairāwhiti: 1; Wairarapa: 10; Capital & Coast: 22; Hutt Valley: 12; Nelson Marlborough: 12; Canterbury: 82; West Coast: 2; South Canterbury: 15; Southern: 28.
  • Weekly COVID-19 Hospitalisations - 7 day rolling average: 609 (This time last week 721)
  • Average age of current COVID-19 hospitalisations: 62
  • Cases in ICU or HDU: 16
  • Vaccination status of new admissions to hospital*: Unvaccinated or not eligible (51 cases); partially immunised <7 days from second dose or have only received one dose (2 cases); double vaccinated at least 7 days before being reported as a case (70 cases); received booster at least 7 days before being reported as a case (289 cases).
 

COVID-19 vaccinations administered​

  • Vaccines administered to date: 4,029,480 first doses; 3,982,392 second doses; 33,956 third primary doses; 2,712,585 first booster doses: 405,529 second booster doses: 266,338 paediatric first doses and 146,448 paediatric second doses
  • Vaccines administered yesterday: 23 first doses; 33 second doses; 5 third primary doses; 480 first booster doses; 7,970 second booster doses; 31 paediatric first doses and 104 paediatric second doses
 
3650 Community Cases

17 Deaths

Auckland - 1309
Canterbury - 463
Waikato - 337
Southern - 247
Wellington - 171
Mid Central - 164
Bay of Plenty - 162
Northland - 134
Hutt Valley - 118
Taranaki - 91
Nelson - 85
Lakes - 79
Hawkes Bay - 72
South Canterbury - 55
Wairarapa - 45
West Coast - 39
Whanganui - 35
Tairawhiti - 34
Unknown - 10
 

COVID-19 deaths​

There are now a total of 1,750 deaths confirmed as attributable to COVID-19, either as the underlying cause of death or as a contributing factor. This is the number that will be reported to the World Health Organization as it provides the most accurate assessment of COVID-19 related mortality in New Zealand.

In the past seven days there have been an average of 14 deaths confirmed each day as being attributable to COVID-19. This is a very sad time for whānau and friends of those who have died, and our thoughts and condolences are with them.

Information on the number of new deaths of people with COVID-19 reported to the Ministry of Health in the last 24 hours, and the seven-day rolling average, is available on the Ministry of Health website. This includes information on the age band and location of these newly reported deaths.
 

COVID-19 hospitalisations​

  • COVID-19 Cases in hospital: total number 546: Northland: 28; Waitematā: 68; Counties Manukau: 57; Auckland: 58; Waikato: 60; Bay of Plenty: 19; Lakes: 9; Hawke’s Bay: 39; MidCentral: 12; Whanganui: 8; Taranaki: 9; Tairawhiti: 1; Wairarapa: 13; Capital & Coast: 20; Hutt Valley: 9; Nelson Marlborough: 8; Canterbury: 85; West Coast: 1; South Canterbury: 14; Southern: 28.
  • Weekly COVID-19 Hospitalisations - 7 day rolling average: 594 (This time last week 703)
  • Average age of current COVID-19 hospitalisations: 62
  • Cases in ICU or HDU: 10
  • Vaccination status of new admissions to hospital*: Unvaccinated or not eligible (49 cases); partially immunised <7 days from second dose or have only received one dose (3 cases); double vaccinated at least 7 days before being reported as a case (75 cases); received booster at least 7 days before being reported as a case (289 cases).
 

COVID-19 vaccinations administered​

  • Vaccines administered to date: 4,029,497 first doses; 3,982,423 second doses; 33,969 third primary doses; 2,713,109 first booster doses: 413,761 second booster doses: 266,366 paediatric first doses and 146,585 paediatric second doses
  • Vaccines administered yesterday: 19 first doses; 30 second doses; 12 third primary doses; 509 first booster doses; 8,213 second booster doses; 28 paediatric first doses and 136 paediatric second doses