General ARL Ownership - Back To The Future

How are the owners sabatoging the club?

  • They Are Having A Negative Influcence On Players And Staff

  • They are Blind To The Reality That's Going On

  • They Have Priorities That Are Making Onfield Performance Difficult

  • They Are Neglecting Their Core Duties As Owners

  • They Are Doing Everything As Well As They Can And It's Not Their Fault


Results are only viewable after voting.

playdaball

Heritage Member
Apr 23, 2012
2,580
...but for the salary cap...otherwise clearly not
Surely there are ways around this? SK can’t be on the same coin as Bellamy, Bennett or Robinson? Same would apply to Iro, Jones, Cayless etc.
New sole owners so time for a new change!
 
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Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
10,580
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wizards rage

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 18, 2016
5,078
Tauranga

Miket12

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 20, 2012
10,580
Don’t leave us hanging... copy and paste please
Unfortunately I can’t - hopefully someone with access to it can. Tried taking a couple of photos of the actual newspaper article but it didn’t work.
 

Horriors2013

1st Grade Fringe
May 24, 2013
2,121
Who would of thought it was the look of the club this whole time! So some new gym equipment and and some new pain is what we need?
He's not saying it's the 'beall'. But it's one of the controllables he wants to tick off. You always hear stories of players looking around facilities when considering contract options. Ours look ghetto (and I know Leichardt and Brooky are arguably worse, but those clubs also have long history on their side). If they at least bring those into presentable state, we eliminate one obstacle.

My issue is, will they look average or like facilities you'd be proud of? I don't think a patch up job is worth it.

The Warriors is a unique opportunity. You're either all-in, or all-out. If Mt. Smart is going to be our home, then make the necessary upgrades. If hesitant, we need to go build a Bankwest stadium on the waterfront. Make the place somewhere players want to go to.
 

Tim burgess

1st Grade Fringe
May 20, 2012
1,388
Facilitates play a big part in employees decision making. I was sceptical of the new Stadium in Parramatta because it forced the closure of the swimming pools.

However, after watching two games at the stadium it makes a high difference in helping to attract players, corporate support and fans.

Essentially, it creates a formula for success both on and off the field.

I think the stadium debate is a bigger factor in Warriors future success.
 

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
20,337
Take a leaf out of Steve Hansen's book: you miss a training, or ask for time off, the club still loves you, but you just gave an opportunity to someone else to grab your spot, and if they perform, you now have to beat that guy to get your spot back.
We need two squads for that. We don't even have one.
 

Ponyandtrap

U20's Player
Sep 21, 2019
37
I’m sure if you grew up in Sydney and the only impressions of Auckland you have are the couple of trips here to spend you’re gone between the airport/hotel/Mt Smart in Aucklands Winter,the warriors become hard to sell to prospective imports,I’d say anything they can do to improve Mt Smart can’t hurt, that said if they were playing in a waterfront stadium......
 

wizards rage

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 18, 2016
5,078
Tauranga
Anyone got the premium story from today Herald about the place being a "bit sloppy"? Would like to read it or know what it says :)
Rugby League: New Warriors owner Mark Robinson to clean up

Change is coming to the Warriors, and it could be coming fast. The NRL club is famously unpredictable but one thing seems certain for 2020 and beyond: Things will be different with Mark Robinson at the helm.

Robinson is chief executive of Autex Industries, who became sole owner of the NRL club last Tuesday, after buying out the 67 per cent stake held by the Carlaw Heritage Trust.

Alongside Autex managing director Rob Croot, Robinson heads a highly successful business, with annual turnover in excess of $100 million, but he's far from your archetypal corporate type.

He drives a Rolls Royce and at the recent Warriors annual awards he spent as much time on the dance floor as he did mixing with sponsors and club staff.


He's a league diehard and a long-time supporter of the Pt Chevalier Pirates.

But most of all, Robinson is a straight shooter, with strong principles and strong opinions.

Asked how the culture can be improved at the Mt Smart club, he doesn't hold back, offering several theories.

"We need to stop the superiority syndrome which is around there," said Robinson. "I see them, some of the senior players think they are better than everyone else. I've seen people when they are injured sitting in the coaches' box, instead of down on the sidelines with their mates. What are they doing in there? I wouldn't dream of going in there.

"Those things make big differences. The other players would notice that, too, some of those players wouldn't be allowed to do that. The rule should be no one goes in there, except for the captain, if he is injured."

As an outsider looking in, Robinson also feels there is too much of a hierarchy within the playing squad.

"They come across like they think they are equal but I don't see that," says Robinson. "I see some players who think they are better than others, and a team has to be equal. Maybe on the field, they are, but off the field, they might be bit more separated than they could be. All humans are equal. Some get paid more than others, but that is because they have more responsibilities and deserve it, but it doesn't mean you can look down on others."

Robinson wants to help drive change.

"They will be told about the expectation and I believe they will embrace it. Some might be put off but hard bloody luck."

Robinson also has clear expectations on head coach Stephen Kearney, who has finished 14th, eighth and 13th during his three seasons in charge.

"Next year has to be his year," said Robinson. "If it's not, it's not and it's probably time to move on. He has been under the pump, he [inherited] a team when he first turned up, he has had three years to change those players around.

"He's got a couple of others coming in but it's hard to get them because the club is not attractive.

"[But] like anyone else in a business, he's on notice. He needs to make the top eight next year, otherwise we will have to have a sit-down."



Robinson also wants to, literally and metaphorically, tidy up the environment at Mt Smart. There will be new changing rooms, and he has gained a commitment from Regional Facilities Auckland to spruce up the ageing ground for the remainder of the lease.



"We will smarten the place up, clean up the offices, make it into a place where people want to come to work, and want to work hard."

It's partly image, mentioning the IT room next to the staff canteen that is "covered in dust and crap" and general dress standards, describing one member of staff turning up to work recently like "he had just come from doing his lawns".

"People are cruising around wearing what they want," says Robinson. "It's not good enough. Like any business I don't care what you wear on a Friday but from Monday to Thursday you are going to look professional and be professional."

Robinson also wants to sharpen the saw around general workplace practices, habits and standards.

"I don't want them to think I am going to come in with an iron fist but at the end of the day too many people have too much time on their hands ... and that's why the place is a bit sloppy I feel. They are not busy enough, a few people.

"I've done it before in Australia and in this business here. People will react pretty well I think."



Despite his no-nonsense approach, Robinson emphasises he is a people person. He's certainly a popular figure as he walks through Autex's sprawling factories in Avondale, and says the company goes the extra mile. There are all kind of staff benefits, generous overtime rates and employees tend to stick around. A hearty soup is provided every day for workers, while a newly-built commercial kitchen will provide heavily subsidised meals daily.



"Business is easy," says Robinson. "You've just got to get the people wanting to work for you and like you. Got to give them what they want, and then they give you what you want.

"We have got that right, and it's because of what we have done over the last 20 years. They are my mates in there, not my workers. They get paid really well, as much overtime as they want and all the things you should get for being away from your family for that long."

Robinson says he likes to empower people, and Autex's ongoing success comes from their team approach, though there is no doubt who is boss.

"Everyone has their responsibilities," says Robinson. "I'll go and discuss things with them, especially with Rob [Croot], and we agree or disagree, but at the end of the day if I want to do it we are doing it.

"[But] I don't interfere very often, only when I think I need to and when I feel something starts to irritate me. I have to do it."

Robinson will need to find the right balance between inspiring others with his vision and passion, but avoiding the flamboyant approach of some English football owners, who condemn their clubs to endless boom-bust cycles through overly emotive reactions and decisions.

"I'm going to be around a fair bit," says Robinson. "Cruising around, doing my thing, talking to people."

Croot, who has worked with Robinson for 18 years, is confident he will strike the right chord.

"You can't empower people and ask them to take risks and spread their wings if you don't know what they are about. That is something that Mark is incredibly intuitive about.

"But Mark is passionate about this. He's not a guy to sit on the sidelines and go 'do what you want and I hope you win boys'. He's here to be a part of it.

"You can bet your life he will be involved in the conversations but it's the same as here, he will be empowering people to make good decisions.

"He'll also sit back and allow people to make bad decisions and then say I saw this coming, you need to learn from this."



The main doors outside Autex reception are emblazoned with various company mottos, giving a snapshot of Robinson's and Croot's approach: "We will laugh, hard and often", "We are generous givers, not self-serving takers", "We imagine big and start small".



Autex is a rare beast, thriving in the manufacturing sector in New Zealand.

Founded in 1967, it continues to expand, with operations in Australia, the United Kingdom, United States and South East Asia and their acoustics and insulation clients include some of the biggest companies in the world.

Autex also has a long, historical link with league. In 1979, they were the first sponsor of the NZRL, associated with the Kiwis' revival in the early to mid-1980s. They've been long-time sponsors of the Warriors, and set up Autex House as a base for young players living away from home.

The corridor leading to the Autex boardroom is lined with sporting and league memorabilia — Kiwis and Warriors jerseys, a Liverpool top, various Pt Chevalier mementos and a montage of signed State of Origin photos, featuring Queensland legends.

It's hard not to escape the feeling the 54-year-old Robinson is living his dream, as the owner of New Zealand's only NRL club.

"I'm not going to sell it. I'm here for the long run, the 10-year ride," says Robinson.

"We are going to build something that we are going to always keep, and treasure and make the New Zealand public proud of their Warriors team, instead of disappointed every year. I want to win an NRL title while we are at Mt Smart Stadium. I've got eight years to do that [before the lease expires] but I'm hoping it is going to be a quicker than that."
 

bruce

Warriors 1st Grader
Contributor
Sep 1, 2015
20,337
Didn’t Owen Glenn go on about a gym and equipment upgrade best club in the xxxx etc.
Glenn was a strange guy, and a showboat, but he did have his own money until it got stolen by Watson and some others.
Robinson pretty much singles Green and Blair out in the stuff version today - refers to only being able to sign “end of the road experience” and also mentions about wanting input into signing a $600k a year player - “they’ll need to tell me why it’s a good idea” and he wants to know the terms and conditions of the contract. This bloke is speaking my language!
Just to add to that, I didn't mind Green sitting at the top table for the forum, but Blair :wtf: . To me that showed a serious problem. Green was overvalued but Blair was seriously overvalued and not even putting in. Assuming he can get around the salary cap I would be surprised if those two and SK are here this time next year.
However, he's not the first owner/prospective owner to promise a facelift of sorts. I'm conscious that quotes in an article are just a snapshot of a mindset. But he did sound like a black n white kind of guy. I hope he doesn't hire and fire all the time. I hope he understands the operational environment and has a vision for how the club will look in 5, 10 years.
That is a good point.

To be fair he didn't say much when he first bought the joint, which might indicate he is speaking with the wisdom of a years pain. As for hiring and firing his company is well run, and if anybody looks at the place when you drive past it does look successful, aside from the fact it obviously is anyway. He seems to have a stable workforce as well.

On that basis we might see some ass kicking at the club. Having said that the only ones I have dealt with are the membership team and the shop. I have absolutely no complaint there, so I don't know where he has identified problems.
 

Bushman

1st Grade Fringe
Aug 12, 2016
614
Rugby League: New Warriors owner Mark Robinson to clean up

Change is coming to the Warriors, and it could be coming fast. The NRL club is famously unpredictable but one thing seems certain for 2020 and beyond: Things will be different with Mark Robinson at the helm.

Robinson is chief executive of Autex Industries, who became sole owner of the NRL club last Tuesday, after buying out the 67 per cent stake held by the Carlaw Heritage Trust.

Alongside Autex managing director Rob Croot, Robinson heads a highly successful business, with annual turnover in excess of $100 million, but he's far from your archetypal corporate type.

He drives a Rolls Royce and at the recent Warriors annual awards he spent as much time on the dance floor as he did mixing with sponsors and club staff.


He's a league diehard and a long-time supporter of the Pt Chevalier Pirates.

But most of all, Robinson is a straight shooter, with strong principles and strong opinions.

Asked how the culture can be improved at the Mt Smart club, he doesn't hold back, offering several theories.

"We need to stop the superiority syndrome which is around there," said Robinson. "I see them, some of the senior players think they are better than everyone else. I've seen people when they are injured sitting in the coaches' box, instead of down on the sidelines with their mates. What are they doing in there? I wouldn't dream of going in there.

"Those things make big differences. The other players would notice that, too, some of those players wouldn't be allowed to do that. The rule should be no one goes in there, except for the captain, if he is injured."

As an outsider looking in, Robinson also feels there is too much of a hierarchy within the playing squad.

"They come across like they think they are equal but I don't see that," says Robinson. "I see some players who think they are better than others, and a team has to be equal. Maybe on the field, they are, but off the field, they might be bit more separated than they could be. All humans are equal. Some get paid more than others, but that is because they have more responsibilities and deserve it, but it doesn't mean you can look down on others."

Robinson wants to help drive change.

"They will be told about the expectation and I believe they will embrace it. Some might be put off but hard bloody luck."

Robinson also has clear expectations on head coach Stephen Kearney, who has finished 14th, eighth and 13th during his three seasons in charge.

"Next year has to be his year," said Robinson. "If it's not, it's not and it's probably time to move on. He has been under the pump, he [inherited] a team when he first turned up, he has had three years to change those players around.

"He's got a couple of others coming in but it's hard to get them because the club is not attractive.

"[But] like anyone else in a business, he's on notice. He needs to make the top eight next year, otherwise we will have to have a sit-down."



Robinson also wants to, literally and metaphorically, tidy up the environment at Mt Smart. There will be new changing rooms, and he has gained a commitment from Regional Facilities Auckland to spruce up the ageing ground for the remainder of the lease.



"We will smarten the place up, clean up the offices, make it into a place where people want to come to work, and want to work hard."

It's partly image, mentioning the IT room next to the staff canteen that is "covered in dust and crap" and general dress standards, describing one member of staff turning up to work recently like "he had just come from doing his lawns".

"People are cruising around wearing what they want," says Robinson. "It's not good enough. Like any business I don't care what you wear on a Friday but from Monday to Thursday you are going to look professional and be professional."

Robinson also wants to sharpen the saw around general workplace practices, habits and standards.

"I don't want them to think I am going to come in with an iron fist but at the end of the day too many people have too much time on their hands ... and that's why the place is a bit sloppy I feel. They are not busy enough, a few people.

"I've done it before in Australia and in this business here. People will react pretty well I think."



Despite his no-nonsense approach, Robinson emphasises he is a people person. He's certainly a popular figure as he walks through Autex's sprawling factories in Avondale, and says the company goes the extra mile. There are all kind of staff benefits, generous overtime rates and employees tend to stick around. A hearty soup is provided every day for workers, while a newly-built commercial kitchen will provide heavily subsidised meals daily.



"Business is easy," says Robinson. "You've just got to get the people wanting to work for you and like you. Got to give them what they want, and then they give you what you want.

"We have got that right, and it's because of what we have done over the last 20 years. They are my mates in there, not my workers. They get paid really well, as much overtime as they want and all the things you should get for being away from your family for that long."

Robinson says he likes to empower people, and Autex's ongoing success comes from their team approach, though there is no doubt who is boss.

"Everyone has their responsibilities," says Robinson. "I'll go and discuss things with them, especially with Rob [Croot], and we agree or disagree, but at the end of the day if I want to do it we are doing it.

"[But] I don't interfere very often, only when I think I need to and when I feel something starts to irritate me. I have to do it."

Robinson will need to find the right balance between inspiring others with his vision and passion, but avoiding the flamboyant approach of some English football owners, who condemn their clubs to endless boom-bust cycles through overly emotive reactions and decisions.

"I'm going to be around a fair bit," says Robinson. "Cruising around, doing my thing, talking to people."

Croot, who has worked with Robinson for 18 years, is confident he will strike the right chord.

"You can't empower people and ask them to take risks and spread their wings if you don't know what they are about. That is something that Mark is incredibly intuitive about.

"But Mark is passionate about this. He's not a guy to sit on the sidelines and go 'do what you want and I hope you win boys'. He's here to be a part of it.

"You can bet your life he will be involved in the conversations but it's the same as here, he will be empowering people to make good decisions.

"He'll also sit back and allow people to make bad decisions and then say I saw this coming, you need to learn from this."



The main doors outside Autex reception are emblazoned with various company mottos, giving a snapshot of Robinson's and Croot's approach: "We will laugh, hard and often", "We are generous givers, not self-serving takers", "We imagine big and start small".



Autex is a rare beast, thriving in the manufacturing sector in New Zealand.

Founded in 1967, it continues to expand, with operations in Australia, the United Kingdom, United States and South East Asia and their acoustics and insulation clients include some of the biggest companies in the world.

Autex also has a long, historical link with league. In 1979, they were the first sponsor of the NZRL, associated with the Kiwis' revival in the early to mid-1980s. They've been long-time sponsors of the Warriors, and set up Autex House as a base for young players living away from home.

The corridor leading to the Autex boardroom is lined with sporting and league memorabilia — Kiwis and Warriors jerseys, a Liverpool top, various Pt Chevalier mementos and a montage of signed State of Origin photos, featuring Queensland legends.

It's hard not to escape the feeling the 54-year-old Robinson is living his dream, as the owner of New Zealand's only NRL club.

"I'm not going to sell it. I'm here for the long run, the 10-year ride," says Robinson.

"We are going to build something that we are going to always keep, and treasure and make the New Zealand public proud of their Warriors team, instead of disappointed every year. I want to win an NRL title while we are at Mt Smart Stadium. I've got eight years to do that [before the lease expires] but I'm hoping it is going to be a quicker than that."
Bruce did you cut and paste or write this?
😋 Robinson sounds like shits gonna happen, if his actions follow his words gonna be interesting times ahead 👍
 

WA supporter

1st Grade Fringe
Contributor
Mar 18, 2017
501
Perth
Signing 30+ year olds on long contracts, with big value for "experience" is bad planning, and lazy recruitment. I can understand buying a decent NRL vet for 1 or 2 seasons on low-mid money to fill a hole, but dropping $600k+, 3 year deals is bad, unless you are signing a genuine very good NRL player - Such as Graham, Cronk etc.

I think Green is a pass mark signing, especially with Shaun Johnson not there. But he slowed this year, cost us several tries in the back end of the season with his old man pace. Blair is a horrendous signing, considering he has another year option in his favour. Green was George hook up,
Am I not just in suggesting that AB has a option on a 4th year deal?!🤮🤮
 

wizards rage

Warriors 1st Grader
Apr 18, 2016
5,078
Tauranga
Am I not just in suggesting that AB has a option on a 4th year deal?!🤮🤮
He definitely does have a player option for a 4th year however some clubs have performance measures that the player has to achieve to get the extension (eg playing in at least half the games the year before the extension to be eligible). Who knows if we have that?

If he’s playing too badly I think the club and player will come to ‘an agreement’ and he won’t excercise the option.
 

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